The DNA Sequencing Facility (DSF) provides investigators with high quality DNA sequencing. In calendar year 2009, the Facility was used by 43 peer-reviewed, funded investigators across four of the Center's five Research Programs. Ninety-eight and one-half percent (98.5%) of use is in support of peer-reviewed, funded investigators. Hardy (Immune Cell Development and Host Defense (ICDHD) Program) assumed direction of the Facility in 1993. In 2004 all automated sequencers were replaced by a single ABI 3100 capillary instrument, providing more reliable high-throughput sequencing. The ABI 3100 was upgraded to a model 3130 in 2007. The DSF provides Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) investigators with computer-readable sequences of their DNA samples in a timely and cost effective manner. Automated sequence analysis is used by investigators to verify DNA constructs, to identify mutations, and to determine the structure of newly cloned genes. The volume of usage of the Facility has continued at a high level averaging 16,000 sequences per year over the last five years. Equitable access and operational oversight of the Facility are assured by recommendations from a Facility Advisory Committee (FAC) and the Facility Parent Oversight Committee (FPOC).

Public Health Relevance

Automated DNA sequencing is a necessary tool in Biomedical Research. Automated sequence analysis is used by investigators to verify DNA constructs, to identify mutations, and to determine the structure of newly cloned genes.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
7P30CA006927-50
Application #
8475336
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
50
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$25,975
Indirect Cost
Name
Research Institute of Fox Chase Cancer Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
064367329
City
Philadelphia
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
19111
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