The main objective of the Molecular Cytology Core Facility (MCCF) is to provide to users state-of-the-art technologies in a multi-user environment, for preparation of tissue samples, for detection, precise localization and analysis of the expression of molecules with important cell functions during development and in cancer. The technologies include in situ localization of mRNA and proteins, cell proliferation, stem cell potential and differentiation, apoptosis and senescence, angiogenesis and hypoxia, histological evaluation and molecular in situ characterization of phenotypes of knock- out, transgenic mice and human tumors. In addition to the training and assistance provided to the researchers in the execution of these technologies, automated experiments for in situ molecular detection are carried at the MCCF. The optical microscopes [wide field, laser scanning (point scanning, spinning disc and multiphoton)] are efficiently used by researchers for image acquisition, including live imaging. Experienced MCCF staff is instrumental in assisting users with stereological analysis, co-localization studies and 3D reconstructions. Specific services provided are: tissue processing and sample preparation;execution of methods for in situ molecular detection;application of a wide range of optical microscopy techniques in conjunction with image acquisition and analysis.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
3P30CA008748-47S4
Application #
8602872
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
1997-01-20
Project End
2014-12-31
Budget Start
2012-01-09
Budget End
2012-12-31
Support Year
47
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$453,825
Indirect Cost
$214,466
Name
Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research
Department
Type
DUNS #
064931884
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10065
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