The Cancer Genetics and Genomics Program includes a group of outstanding investigators making Important and major contributions to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenesis, the identification of genes that contribute to and confer susceptibility to cancer, and the translation of genomic signatures into clinical practice. This is a very Interactive and Integrated group of investigators that form a cohesive unit focused on the common goals of identifying genes involved in oncogenesis and their role in the development of human cancer. The activities of the program are organized into two specific areas of scientific focus that Include cancer genetics, with a focus on the Identification of genes that define risk of onset for disease;and cancer genomics, that involve programs applying technologies, particulariy DNA microarray analysis, to better understand the characteristics of tumors. These two aspects of the Program are tightly Integrated and exceedingly synergistic with work flowing between each to Influence the activities of the others. Indeed, we view a major strength of the Cancer Genetics and Genomics program to be the Interrelated activity - discoveries in work on oncogenic signaling pathways feeds the cancer genetics and genomics activities. Conversely, advances made in genomic applications to cancer outcomes have Impacted the study of oncogenic pathways. Indeed, this integration has led to the successful competition of a major NCI funded program in systems biology - the Integrated Cancer Biology Program - In which the focus of the program is tightly linked with activities of the Cancer Genetics and Genomics Program. Perhaps most importantly, studies in the program have led to the development of a series of genomic signatures for the prediction of lung cancer outcomes, chemotherapy sensitivity, and pathway activation tied to response to targeted therapeutics in which the science has formed the basis for translational studies in the form of multiple prospective clinical trials. The Program includes 21 members from 9 basic and clinical departments within Duke University.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA014236-40
Application #
8601809
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-01-01
Budget End
2014-12-31
Support Year
40
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$15,560
Indirect Cost
Name
Duke University
Department
Type
DUNS #
044387793
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27705
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