The Cancer Institute of New Jersey (CINJ) prevails, as the State of New Jersey's only National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, to satisfy the cancer research demands of one of the most diverse and densely populated States in our Nation. As a matrix and consortium cancer center that has been continuously funded by the NCI CCSG mechanism since 1997, CINJ conducts state of the art research, patient care, and outreach/education. CINJ is currently comprised of 161 members from a total of 32 academic departments who hold over $92.9 million total peer-reviewed support, $61.1 million annual direct support, $28.9 million total NCI support and $18.7 million annual direct NCI support (a 20% Increase in NCI support since the time ofthe last submission in 2004). Since the appointment of Dr. Robert S. DiPaola as center director in September, 2008, accrual onto investigator initiated therapeutic clinical trials has more than doubled;17 new faculty were recruited in multiple areas including Basic Science, Clinical Science, Public Health Science, and Systems Biology/Bioinformatics;the Consortium relationship with Princeton University and Rutgers University was strengthened and formalized;the State's cancer registry and SEER contract was moved to CINJ;and an additional four recruitment searches were launched. CINJ now has six established Research Programs: Cell Death and Survival Signaling;Genomic Instability and Tumor Growth;Cancer Pharmacology and Preclinical Therapeutics;Clinical Investigations;Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention;and Cancer Prevention and Control. CINJ supports 14 Shared Resources, including: Flow Cytometry and Cell Sorting;Functional Genomics;Transgenic and Knockout Mouse;Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics;Histopathology and Imaging;Biorepository Service;Bioinformatics;Biometrics;Research Pharmacy;Office of Human Research Services;Centralized Education and Training for Clinical Research Personnel; Small Animal Imaging (developing);Metabolomics (developing) and Epidemiology Services (developing). Overall, CINJ has a unique niche among NCI-designated centers, as it benefits from opportunities as a matrix cancer center and at the same time has State-wide authority beyond the University matrix, thus establishing an environment to foster and formalize a Vision of Transdisciplinary and Translational Research within and beyond the University matrix. We are requesting CCSG support for Senior leadership, Program Leadership, Planning and Evaluation, Developmental Funds, Administration, Shared Resources, Protocol Review and Monitoring, Protocol Specific Research Support, and Data and Safety Monitoring.

Public Health Relevance

The mission ofthe CINJ is to conduct innovative basic, clinical and population research that: 1. Expands our understanding of the etiology and biology of cancer. 2. Facilitates the rapid translation of laboratory-based discoveries into human studies. 3. Develops new approaches and interventions for cancer prevention that decrease cancer incidence and mortality. 4. Develops new and better therapies to decrease suffering and mortality from cancer.(2) Fulfillment of this mission will be achieved in an environment that values diversity and fairness(3), and one that is dedicated to the development of the next generation of physicians and scientists and to delivering comprehensive and compassionate patient care.(4)

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
3P30CA072720-14S4
Application #
8532093
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Program Officer
Silkensen, Shannon M
Project Start
1997-03-01
Project End
2014-02-28
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2013-02-28
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$50,641
Indirect Cost
$18,590
Name
University of Medicine & Dentistry of NJ
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
617022384
City
Piscataway
State
NJ
Country
United States
Zip Code
08854
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