The Computer Resources Core (Core B) provides a spectrum of services to support and enhance the research endeavors of a core group of scientists investigating questions related to hearing, communication and balance at the University of Washington. The overall goal is to increase the productivity of our research through better use of computers. Specifically, we aim to: enable completely new types of research;accelerate development and spread of technologies new to the University of Washington;facilitate collaboration or interaction among users of the Core;help reduce redundant work by providing consolidated computer expertise accessible by all users of the core;maintain a high level of basic computer support for all supported research groups. We endeavor to provide computer expertise within a broad enough scientific context that any one solution would have potential for more than one application. In consultation with the members of the Core, the Computer Specialists supported by the Core will select a software package or develop custom software to fit the goals of the experiment or analysis desired. The Computer Specialists are responsible for testing and debugging software applications and training and assisting core users to apply the software in their research. Likewise, hardware solutions will be implemented in a similar manner. The Computer Specialists will also help to disseminate information about solutions to particular problems to other Core investigators who might be able to incorporate such solutions into their.own research.

Public Health Relevance

Increasing the efficiency and efficacy of research on hearing, communication and balance will help, in the short term, bring new therapies to the bedside. In the long term, better understanding of the basic normal operation of the organs and systems underiying these functions, as well as the processes leading to disorders, is likely to lead to better prevention and treatment of such disorders and to improved human health.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DC004661-14
Application #
8526213
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDC1-SRB-Q)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$181,014
Indirect Cost
$64,980
Name
University of Washington
Department
Type
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
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