The Tissue Engineering and Cell Models Core (TECM) enables DDRCC investigators to address key questions relating to causality and mechanisms by providing novel and vetted experimental models that can be customized to their needs. It was established 21 months ago, replacing the Genomics and Molecular Engineering (GME) Core of the DDRCC. The reorganization of the Core was a direct result of two sequential annual needs assessments indicating strong interest by the membership for more physiologically-relevant experimental models to study digestive health and diseases. The TECM has three major components: (1) A centralized repository and facility for established and primary gut-relevant cell lines, which was originally part of the host-microbe core, but moved to the TECM to centralize all cell and tissue experimental systems, (2) A tissue engineering component that includes customizing and developing intestinal organoid technologies for specific applications needed by DDRCC users, and (3) an experimental systems component that includes in vivo models (rodent microsurgery and C. elegans), ex vivo models, and live functional assays. Inherent to these services, the TECM provides training and education, opportunities for cost-savings through bulk purchases (serum, disposables, etc), and technical expertise that saves investigators time and insure high quality of services. The TECM is inextricably tied to the other DDRCC cores. The integrated Translational Research (ITR) and the Host-Microbe (HM) cores are essential for providing cells, tissues, and patient samples for establishing the experimental models. The Tissue and Cell Analysis (TCA) core provides investigators with the means to analyze data derived from the model systems. Thus, the TECM Core has had great impact in enabling DDRCC members to advance knowledge in the thematic areas fostered by the DDRCC which focus on the study of IBD, host-microbe interactions, mucosal immunology and inflammation. In the past year, it was used by 86% of the DDRCC membership and was used in 195 peer-reviewed publications or 65% of the total (306) DDRCC-acknowledged publications during this period. The TECM has promoted interaction, collaboration, cost-sharing, and efficient resources utilization, and, at the same time, has enhanced the capabilities of our investigators.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK042086-29
Application #
9617239
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2018-12-01
Budget End
2019-11-30
Support Year
29
Fiscal Year
2019
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Chicago
Department
Type
DUNS #
005421136
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60637
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Lu, Jing; Synowiec, Sylvia; Lu, Lei et al. (2018) Microbiota influence the development of the brain and behaviors in C57BL/6J mice. PLoS One 13:e0201829
Shiloh, Ruth; Gilad, Yuval; Ber, Yaara et al. (2018) Non-canonical activation of DAPK2 by AMPK constitutes a new pathway linking metabolic stress to autophagy. Nat Commun 9:1759
Wang, Haitao; Cheng, Minying; Dsouza, Melissa et al. (2018) Soil Bacterial Diversity Is Associated with Human Population Density in Urban Greenspaces. Environ Sci Technol 52:5115-5124
Khambu, Bilon; Huda, Nazmul; Chen, Xiaoyun et al. (2018) HMGB1 promotes ductular reaction and tumorigenesis in autophagy-deficient livers. J Clin Invest 128:2419-2435
Cason, Cori A; Dolan, Kyle T; Sharma, Gaurav et al. (2018) Plasma microbiome-modulated indole- and phenyl-derived metabolites associate with advanced atherosclerosis and postoperative outcomes. J Vasc Surg 68:1552-1562.e7
Christensen, B; Micic, D; Gibson, P R et al. (2018) Vedolizumab in patients with concurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory bowel disease does not improve liver biochemistry but is safe and effective for the bowel disease. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 47:753-762
Peñalver Bernabé, Beatriz; Cralle, Lauren; Gilbert, Jack A (2018) Systems biology of the human microbiome. Curr Opin Biotechnol 51:146-153
Amin, Ruhul; Asplin, John; Jung, Daniel et al. (2018) Reduced active transcellular intestinal oxalate secretion contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated hyperoxaluria. Kidney Int 93:1098-1107
Lu, Jing; Lu, Lei; Yu, Yueyue et al. (2018) Effects of Intestinal Microbiota on Brain Development in Humanized Gnotobiotic Mice. Sci Rep 8:5443

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