Morphologic analysis remains an essential tool for visualizing the spatial relationships of different cell types, and studying cellular components in the Gl tract. The unique feature of this Morphology Core Facility is the expertise it provides to participating investigators on the structural biology of the Gl tract. Its primary function has been to train and assist investigators in the morphologic analysis of the Gl tract It has also served as an important resource for rapid processing of tissue specimens and for providing investigators with newly developed methods/protocols and reagents for labeling tissue sections. Before the establishment of this Core, DDRCC investigators had poor access to histology services (limited availability, long turn-around, variable quality, and high fees). Because many DDRCC investigators are junior faculty with limited resources, funding for, and access to, the Morphology core has benefited this group, as well as more senior investigators (see Exhibit). This core has provides expert technical service related to the processing of Gl tissue and cell samples. These functions require investment in expensive equipment, and sample preparation and operation of sophisticated instrumentation require highly trained experienced technicians. It is, therefore, much more cost effective to concentrate instrumentation and highly skilled technical support in a centrally managed facility where they can be utilized a high percentage ofthe time. The DDRCC Morphology Core is the onlv histology facilitv at this institution that provides immunohistochemical staining on a fee for service basis. The Morphology Core also serves as a focus for the collective expertise at this institution and rapid dissemination of new techniques. It facilitates exchange of reagents such as antibodies and tissue blocks, and has fostered many collaborations between DDRCC members.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30DK052574-14
Application #
8427338
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-8)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-12-01
Budget End
2013-11-30
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$174,626
Indirect Cost
$59,740
Name
Washington University
Department
Type
DUNS #
068552207
City
Saint Louis
State
MO
Country
United States
Zip Code
63130
Brenot, Audrey; Knolhoff, Brett L; DeNardo, David G et al. (2018) SNAIL1 action in tumor cells influences macrophage polarization and metastasis in breast cancer through altered GM-CSF secretion. Oncogenesis 7:32
Luo, Jialie; Feng, Jing; Yu, Guang et al. (2018) Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4-expressing macrophages and keratinocytes contribute differentially to allergic and nonallergic chronic itch. J Allergy Clin Immunol 141:608-619.e7
Tarr, Gillian A M; Oltean, Hanna N; Phipps, Amanda I et al. (2018) Strength of the association between antibiotic use and hemolytic uremic syndrome following Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection varies with case definition. Int J Med Microbiol 308:921-926
Baumann-Dudenhoeffer, Aimee M; D'Souza, Alaric W; Tarr, Phillip I et al. (2018) Infant diet and maternal gestational weight gain predict early metabolic maturation of gut microbiomes. Nat Med 24:1822-1829
Kumar, Pardeep; Kuhlmann, F Matthew; Chakraborty, Subhra et al. (2018) Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-blood group A interactions intensify diarrheal severity. J Clin Invest 128:3298-3311
Smith, Gordon I; Commean, Paul K; Reeds, Dominic N et al. (2018) Effect of Protein Supplementation During Diet-Induced Weight Loss on Muscle Mass and Strength: A Randomized Controlled Study. Obesity (Silver Spring) 26:854-861
Bockerstett, Kevin A; Wong, Chun Fung; Koehm, Sherri et al. (2018) Molecular Characterization of Gastric Epithelial Cells Using Flow Cytometry. Int J Mol Sci 19:
Porter, Lane C; Franczyk, Michael P; Pietka, Terri et al. (2018) NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT3 in adipocytes is dispensable for maintaining normal adipose tissue mitochondrial function and whole body metabolism. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 315:E520-E530
Rubin, Deborah C (2018) CFTR and the Regulation of Crypt Cell Proliferation. Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol 5:418-419
Hoshi, Masato; Reginensi, Antoine; Joens, Matthew S et al. (2018) Reciprocal Spatiotemporally Controlled Apoptosis Regulates Wolffian Duct Cloaca Fusion. J Am Soc Nephrol 29:775-783

Showing the most recent 10 out of 899 publications