Since phase I of our COBRE grant we have had a pilot project program and we plan to continue that program into phase III. The purpose of this program is to encourage faculty, especially junior faculty, to do research in project related to osteoarthritis by giving them the mentoring and support for pilot projects necessary for larger NIH grants such as those funded through the R01 mechanism. The pilot projects also extend the faculty involved in COBRE funded projects, which helps us as we create core resources and plan for program project grants. Through this mechanism we aim to enhance and grow the scientific community to advance osteoarthritis research at the University of Delaware. Pilot projects are generally given $50,000 (direct costs) for one year but may be renewed for a second year under meritorious circumstances. Most of the funding requested is for stipends for research assistants and for laboratory supplies (our university has waived tuition for graduate students). All pilot project PIs are required to have one scientific mentor. Projects are selected based on a two-stage review process. Priority scores are given by members of our Internal Steering Committee and funding decisions are made by our External Advisory Committee.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
1P30GM103333-01
Application #
8461099
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-RI-B (01))
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-08-01
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$153,000
Indirect Cost
$56,958
Name
University of Delaware
Department
Type
DUNS #
059007500
City
Newark
State
DE
Country
United States
Zip Code
19716
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