The primary focus of the Stem Cell Core is the isolation and characterization of various types of stem cells and the fate tracing of their committed derivatives, although it will also be useful for sorting neuronal and glial cells for many IDDRC projects. This is accomplished using flow cytometry, based on the detection of cell surface markers, fluorescent proteins expressed under the control of specific gene promoters within transfected vectors or staining of nucleic acids with various staining dyes. The core is instrumental in the purification and characterization of adult stem cells isolated from neural and skeletal muscle tissue, purification of progenitor cells from iPS (induced Pluripotent Stem) and ES (Embryonic Stem) ceil lines, and isolation of cells whether cultured or from tissue that are expressing a fluorescent protein under the control of a specific promoter in a transfected vector. The core is proficient and experienced in handling zebrafish, mouse, and human cells. The extensive experience of the core's leadership ensures investigators expert assistance for their experiments and training in the use of successful techniques. Our principle objective is to provide both IDDRC and non-IDDRC researchers with comprehensive stem cell and stem cell derivative isolation and characterization services in a timely, dependable and cost-effective manner.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30HD018655-32
Application #
8509733
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-DSR-Y)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
32
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$61,739
Indirect Cost
$26,256
Name
Children's Hospital Boston
Department
Type
DUNS #
076593722
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02115
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