The Genomics/Proteomics Core (GPC) of the IDDRC at Children's National Medical Center (Children's National, CN) has been highly active, with over 7,000 samples processed during the last award period and support for more than 40 investigators. Two key aspects of the success of the Core include innovation (new equipment and assays offered each year), and full service (including assistance with experimental design, sample processing, technical support and training, bioinformatics assistance, and help with grants and manuscripts). New technologies and services that will be implemented during the proposed new award period include emulsion PCR (RainDance custom panels), epigenomics scans (both Illumina and Pacific Biosciences single molecule whole genome), nextgen sequencing (Illumina and Pacific Biosciences), glycoproteomics, and phosphoproteomic scans. Objectives of the Core are: 1. Supply full service and innovative genomic and proteomic research tools to IDDRC investigators from project planning to data interpretation and manuscript writing with no service fees (users pay only for the cost of reagents). 2. Rapid acquisition and implementation of cutting-edge high-content technology. 3. Support of multi-scale projects inclusive of DNA, mRNA, microRNA, epigenomics, proteomics, and integrative and systems biology bioinformatics approaches. 4. Offer group and individualized training to increase Core capacity and provide flexibility to investigators. 5. Leverage Core support to users through synergism and integration of commensurate NIH- and philanthropy-supported genomics/proteomics/bioinformatics Cores: NICHD's National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR-DC) Core for Molecular &Functional Outcome Measures in Rehabilitation Medicine, the CTSI-CN Genomics/Proteomics Core for Children's Translational Medicine, and the Sheikh Zayad Institute for Surgical Innovation. These synergisms enable introduction of advanced new and costly equipment into the IDDRC Genomics/Proteomics Core, and offer unique and substantial opportunities for resource sharing and collaboration for IDDRC investigators. In the previous Summary Statements of the 2006 review, the Genomics and Proteomics Core (previously called MGPAC) received an outstanding evaluation. The previous reviewers felt that bioinformatics support could be bolstered further, and better integrated with the Statistical Core. Towards this end, we have added two faculties to the Genomics/Proteomics Core personnel: statistical geneticist Dr. Gordish-Dressman and biomedical engineer and bioinformatics specialist Dr. Wang, and have ongoing meetings with the Statistical Core to integrate efforts. We have also submitted grants together with bioinformatics researchers at Georgetown University and Virginia Tech to continue our methods development work in bioinformatics support. Our Core experienced considerable expansion in the number of samples and complexity of user projects over the last funding cycle. A formal survey of anticipated user needs showed emerging strong demand for epigenomics, miRNA expression profiling, ELISA bead assays, next-generation sequencing, quantitative proteomics using stable isotope labeling and label free strategies, phosphoproteomics and glycoproteomics. To meet these needs, we significantly increased service offerings, implemented new equipment and new expertise. Our emphasis remains on offering highly specialized, innovative, full service support for a broad spectrum of genomic, proteomic and bioinformatic technologies.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30HD040677-14
Application #
8733076
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-07-01
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Children's Research Institute
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Washington
State
DC
Country
United States
Zip Code
20052
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