The Multiscale Imaging and Proteomics Core provides imaging of live animals, tissues, cells, and macromolecules coupled with protein characterization and quantitation services. The Core encompasses three umbrella technology thrusts: 1. Advanced multiscale imaging technology (headed by Dr. Ellisman);2. Fluorescent reporters, indicators, and labels to monitor physiological and biochemical processes (headed by Dr. Tsien);and 3. Protein identification and quantitative proteomics (headed by Dr. Komives). This facility leverages the instrumentation and expertise of the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR) and the Biomolecular and Proteomics Mass Spectrometry Facility. These resources have been used to investigate the molecular mechanisms and the development of models that can be implemented to study the effects of exposure to superfund toxicants. The NCMIR is an NIH-supported National Biotechnology Research and Development Site, supported by NIH/NCRR and NIEHS. The NCMIR houses versatile, cutting-edge imaging technologies, including state-of-the-art computer workstations and digital display facilitates, enabling research projects to employ the most sophisticated and up-to-date imaging modalities. The collaboration between Dr. Tsien's and Dr. Ellisman's groups continues to develop and refine biological reagents and tools useful for molecular detection and monitoring of intracellular interactions. The Biomolecular and Proteomics facility has a long history of supporting SRP researchers particularly in the areas of LC/MSMS quantitation. It has expanded capabilities to include identification and quantitation (using ITRAQ) of large numbers of proteins and their post-translational modifications from complex mixtures. These imaging and proteomic technologies require expensive instrumentation, are constantly evolving and are practiced by highly specialized personnel. The Multiscale Imaging and Proteomics Core is vital to our program in two respects: (1) it provides advanced technology that enables sophisticated scientific imaging, protein analysis and data management at the frontiers of interdisciplinary work, and (2) it provides the capacity for the sharing of knowledge through science communication (e.g.. Dr. Karin's work and the March 2010 cover of Science showing the power of electron microscopy), which will help our Research Translation Core and Community Engagement Core meet its aims.

Public Health Relevance

It is fully anticipated that this facility will play an important role in technology development that will aid investigators in elucidating the molecular mechanisms that lead to environmentally initiated illness and disease. The wide range of imaging and proteomic based instrumentation in these facilities will underlie the development of important biological models that are to be leveraged by Research Translation and Community Engagement for identification and remediation of hazardous environmental toxicants.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Hazardous Substances Basic Research Grants Program (NIEHS) (P42)
Project #
5P42ES010337-12
Application #
8463194
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-JAB-J)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
12
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$172,717
Indirect Cost
$72,113
Name
University of California San Diego
Department
Type
DUNS #
804355790
City
La Jolla
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
92093
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