This National Alcohol Survey (NAS) Resources core component, active all years, generates, manages and provides needed NAS datasets to 3 Center research components (4, 5 and 7) and to other independent investigators. The Center has conducted NAS surveys of the adult (age 18 up) US population at about 5-year intervals since the 1960s, with considerable standardization of measures since 1979 (the 6th NAS or N6). Addressing steps described below involving the existing datasets and new NAS data (e.g, the 2009/10 N12 survey), this scientific core will conduct (in conjunction with a skilled fieldwork organization) a new National Alcohol Survey (N13), with design refinements Including dual-frame cell phone and landline sampling, plus as earlier, African American, Hispanic oversamples. For this household survey, instrument development and piloting begins in 2013, fielding in 2014, with completion by early 2015. Throughout the proposed period, beginning in year 1, we will prepare for investigators (working with the Statistical and Data Services Core (SDSC), component 2) NAS datasets for analysis in the Center's research components, affiliated independent grants, and by other researchers. Dataset enhancements will include (a) cleaning and (b) weighting data, and additional routine methodologically oriented tasks to (c) adjust alcohol consumption measures for the alcohol content in specific beverages, consumed on- and off premise, using both NAS drink size and beverage type data and the Center's present methodological drink size home and bar studies;(d) provide certain data imputations (e.g., to address missing income data);(e) develop and confirm algorithms (e.g., for calculating mean intake, or volume);(f) create needed scales (e.g., for measuring Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) and other constructs);and (g) conduct, with the SDSC biostatisticians, needed psychometric analyses to provide basic reliability and validity information. For N12 and N13, we will (h) add geo-referenced contextual data elements drawn from Census and other archival sources. When ready, we will (i) merge new with earlier NAS data in the series extending from N6 through N12 (gathered by early 2010 during the current Center Cycle) then, in year 5, adding N13 data. Using the Methodology component 7 Sub-Study 1 results, we will introduce new post-stratification weights to improve estimates from analyses requiring variables available only in the landline instrument. Finally, per the data-sharing plan, we wilt de-identify the NAS data and periodically place datasets and supporting documentation in the public domain, by agreement with the Alcohol Epidemiological Data System (AEDS), managed for NlAAA and grantees by CSR, Inc.

Public Health Relevance

This Center Core Component collects and manages 5-yearly National Alcohol Surveys; a unique 30-year data series including the 2009/10 NAS and a proposed 2014/15 NAS. This US adult household series is vital for long-term monitoring of the nation s drinking patterns and problems; and for conducting innovative new analyses to address key epidemiological hypotheses about the effects of alcohol in human populations. The NAS is important to public health science; for analyzing policy; prevention and health care impacts.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50AA005595-34
Application #
8597264
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAA1-GG)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-01-01
Budget End
2014-12-31
Support Year
34
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$451,502
Indirect Cost
$34,785
Name
Public Health Institute
Department
Type
DUNS #
128663390
City
Oakland
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94607
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