The Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism (CTNA) places a high priority on maintaining an efficient flow of information to promote the safe and successful completion of proposed studies, to support the initiation of novel pilot studies, to facilitate the career development of trainees and junior faculty affiliated with the Center, and to promote the dissemination of research advances. However, the CTNA views its mission as "translational" in that it places a high priority on the interplay between basic and clinical neuroscience. Thus, its administrative, monitoring, and educational components include representation from basic and clinical neuroscience, and an essential charge of these is to preserve the integrity of the translational mission. The Administrative Core provides for the centralized organizational functions of the Center for the Translational Neuroscience of Alcoholism (CTNA). These functions include 1) the central executive function of the Center (Director, Executive Committee), 2) financial oversight, 3) data safety monitoring (Data Safety Monitoring Board), 4) educational functions (Education Committee), 5) and external ongoing review of the scientific merit of CTNA activities (Scientific Advisory Board).

Public Health Relevance

The Administrative Core has a central organizing function designed to oversee the financial expenditures, data quality, safety of participants, educational activities and scientific merit of the CTNA activities. An overarching goal is to promote the integration of scientific information from animal research and human studies in order to understand mechanisms of alcoholism risk and to provide a scientific foundation for the development of prevention efforts and treatment interventions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50AA012870-13
Application #
8467655
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAA1-GG)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-06-01
Budget End
2014-05-31
Support Year
13
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$274,260
Indirect Cost
$80,984
Name
Yale University
Department
Type
DUNS #
043207562
City
New Haven
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06520
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