The Administrative Core will be responsible for the managerial oversight of all Johns Hopkins Prostate SPORE Program activities. In addition, the Core will help facilitate interactions between Johns Hopkins Prostate Cancer SPORE Program Investigators and investigators associated with other Prostate Cancer initiatives. The managerial structure of Johns Hopkins Prostate Cancer SPORE Program, with Its Principal Investigator, Co-Principal Investigator, Executive Committee, Internal Oversight Committee, and External Scientific Advisory Board, has been designed to promote translational research by creating a prostate cancer research culture and transcends academic departments, medical disciplines, and individual research skills, and providing high quality monitoring, evaluation, and oversight of the SPORE portfolio of Research Projects, Core Resources, the Career Development Program, and the Developmental Research Program. The Administrative Core will provide communications, resources, including teleconferences, travel funds, and administrative staffing for all its managerial activities.

Public Health Relevance

Prostate cancer remains the leading cause of cancer of men in the United States. This Core provides for a coordination and facilitation of efforts to bring novel therapeutic approaches to the disease as well as biomarkers that can provide disease signatures.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
2P50CA058236-19A1
Application #
8739716
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-7 (M1))
Project Start
1997-09-30
Project End
2019-08-31
Budget Start
2014-09-25
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
19
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$136,811
Indirect Cost
$52,360
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
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