The Career Development Program (CDP) is an essential component of the PNW Prostate SPORE that serves to sustain and enhance our mission by attracting and nurturing new and talented research faculty. The CDP will continue to implement a strategy that has successfully developed clinical, basic, and population scientists for productive careers in translational prostate cancer research.
The specific aims are: 1. Provide research support for junior faculty, advanced fellows, and established investigators who wish to develop or refocus their careers on translational prostate cancer research;2. Provide a system for mentoring faculty and advanced fellows pursuing prostate cancer research in a broad range of disciplines;3. Create a framework in which investigators can gain exposure to, and training in, aspects of translational prostate cancer research outside their areas of expertise (e.g., a molecular biologist would be exposed to clinical issues in prostate cancer care by attending tumor boards and clinical prostate cancer conferences); 4. Attract and retain women, minorities and junior faculty who can make key contributions to translational prostate cancer research at the institutions comprising the PNW Prostate SPORE. The CDP will be coordinated between the FHCRC and the University ofWashington (UW);the Prostate Centre at the Vancouver General Hospital (VGH);and the Oregon Health Science University (OHSU). Our organizational structure works across sites and includes recruitment and monitoring of candidates by a career development committee, educational coordination through a conference and education committee, and access to more than 45 multidisciplinary investigators both within and outside the SPORE whose research interests provide relevant experience in translational prostate cancer research. The CDP educational program combines a wide spectrum of individual research opportunities, formal educational courses, and a large number of conferences and seminars in translational prostate cancer research. We plan to continue to recruit both qualified faculty members and senior research fellows who wish to expand their work in translational prostate cancer research, focusing on the inclusion of underrepresented minority applicants. In addition to SPORE grant support, this program will be augmented by substantial institutional resources.

Public Health Relevance

Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer deaths in men. Developing translational research scientists in prostate cancer that specialize in clinical, basic, and population sciences research will enhance our understanding of the disease biology, expand treatment options, and improve outcomes for patients.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50CA097186-12
Application #
8933583
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-RPRB-M (M1))
Program Officer
Hruszkewycz, Andrew M
Project Start
2002-09-19
Project End
2018-08-31
Budget Start
2014-09-01
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
12
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$165,573
Indirect Cost
$63,739
Name
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
078200995
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98109
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