The Genetics core will coordinate the collection of genotype data for the appropriate projects. These data will primarily be ancestry informative markers (AIMs) for the estimation of individual ancestry. The core will both lead the selection of AIMs for the project, to provide maximal information in the Latina populations studied, as well as actually generate the ancestry estimates. The actual collection of the genotype data will be performed in year 5 of the project, for three reasons. First, genotyping is much more cost effective (and technically consistent) when performed in a single batch. Because several of the projects may not complete recruitment until year 4, it is prudent to delay genotyping until recruitment is complete. The other reason to push genotyping into year 4 is technical: not only is it likely that AIM panels will tie refined for Hispanic populations over the coming years, but the cost of collecting genotypes tends to decrease with each year. Thus, by delaying the genotype collection effort until all samples are available, we can maximize the information content of the AIM panel, and minimize the cost of collecting the data.

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National Cancer Institute (NCI)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-SRLB-3)
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Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
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Molina, Yamile; Hempstead, Bridgette H; Thompson-Dodd, Jacci et al. (2015) Medical Advocacy and Supportive Environments for African-Americans Following Abnormal Mammograms. J Cancer Educ 30:447-52
Molina, Yamile; Lehavot, Keren; Beadnell, Blair et al. (2014) Racial Disparities in Health Behaviors and Conditions Among Lesbian and Bisexual Women: The Role of Internalized Stigma. LGBT Health 1:131-139
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Molina, Yamile; Hohl, Sarah D; Ko, Linda K et al. (2014) Understanding the patient-provider communication needs and experiences of Latina and non-Latina White women following an abnormal mammogram. J Cancer Educ 29:781-9
Molina, Yamile; Yi, Jean C; Martinez-Gutierrez, Javiera et al. (2014) Resilience among patients across the cancer continuum: diverse perspectives. Clin J Oncol Nurs 18:93-101
Molina, Yamile; Kim, Sage; Berrios, Nerida et al. (2014) Medical mistrust and patient satisfaction with mammography: the mediating effects of perceived self-efficacy among navigated African American women. Health Expect :
Molina, Yamile; Beresford, Shirley A A; Espinoza, Noah et al. (2014) Psychological distress, social withdrawal, and coping following receipt of an abnormal mammogram among different ethnicities: a mediation model. Oncol Nurs Forum 41:523-32
Molina, Y; Ramirez-Valles, J (2013) HIV/AIDS stigma: measurement and relationships to psycho-behavioral factors in Latino gay/bisexual men and transgender women. AIDS Care 25:1559-68
Balsam, Kimberly F; Beadnell, Blair; Molina, Yamile (2013) The Daily Heterosexist Experiences Questionnaire: Measuring Minority Stress Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adults. Meas Eval Couns Dev 46:3-25

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