Administrative Core Leadership We propose a core research team (8 people), made up of the two Center Pis, the Pis of each of the 3 Research Projects, one of the Lenoir County Alliance for a Healthy Community co-chairs, the PI of the ECU sub-contract, a trainee representative, and the project director. Tliis committee will meet bi-weekly (conference call option) for the first 6 months and then re-assess the frequency of meetings thereafter. Advisory Committees ? Lenoir County Alliance for a Healthy Community This group is made up of a wide range of clinical and public health practitioners as well as representatives from community-based organizations. They have offered to serve as an advisory committee for the CPHHD and meet on a regular basis. This group will assure that the research efforts are meeting the needs and are sensitive to the culture of the community. They will also help the research team identify necessary contacts and create relationships within the community. As the project evolves, we may add some members for CPHHD specific meetings, particularly to assure that the smaller communities of Pink Hill and LaGrange are represented. ? Executive Committee of Community Campus Partnership for Tomorrow Mr. Will Lamb and Dr. Mike Smith, who chairs this committee, have offered to have it serve as an advisory committee within the UNC system. It includes representatives such as Leslie Boney (Appendix A) who is the Associate Vice President for Economic Development Research, Policy &Planning within the 16 campus UNC system, and a number offaculty and administrators from the School of Government, who are working closely with Lenoir County on economic development efforts. ? NC TraCS Institute Drs. Ammerman and Patterson are involved with a number of committees and cores affiliated with NC TraCS. In particular. Dr. Ammerman sils on the TRAB - Translational Research Advisory Board which meets quarterly. The TRAB acts as an advisor to the CTSA leadership on current, planned, and future activities of the NC TraCS Institute. TRAB board members work to find ways to stimulate multidisciplinary research between their constituents and serve as communicators bringing information to and from TRAB, which includes representatives from across the UNC Chapel Hill campus, particularly those with a clinical and/or translational research mission. Integration ofthe research projects, shared resource cores and training components We created the diagram above to indicate broad interaction rather than directional relationships. It is also intended that the shared resource cores would be available to the broader university as well as the CPHHD national network. While we anticipate that the Genomics Bioinformatics core would interface most closely with Research Project 1: CVD Genetic Predispositions and Genomic Signatures, we also believe that as we learn more about possible genetic associations with social determinants of health, we will need to explore how to communicate the potential risks and benefits to members of the community in a way that is informative and helpful rather than confusing and potentially paralyzing. Also important will be finding ways to incorporate this new knowledge into training so that researchers and clinicians alike are prepared to use this information wisely. Organizational strategies for productivity - Technology will play a key role in facilitating project communications and operations among the faculty, staff, and other collaborators housed in various buildings across the vast UNC campus and geographically dispersed in different locations across our state. One of our first priorities will be to create a secure project website for dissemination of information and document-sharing purposes among the research team (modeled after a website designed in-house by the HPDP IT Director for another large research project). Regular meetings will be held in-person, via teleconferencing, and when listserv and interactive, online forums (blogs) to post questions, contribute ideas, join discussions, and share project challenges. The project meeting structure is proposed as follows: ? Two Center Pis: weekly check-in meetings, with an invitation to the other lead researchers to participate as needed ? Core research team: bi-weekly meetings of the two Center Pis, the Pis of each of the 3 Research Projects, one of the Lenoir County Alliance for a Healthy Community co-chairs, the PI of the ECU subcontract, a trainee representative, and the project director ? Full research team: quarterly meetings of a|l members ofthe research project, with one meeting per year occurring in Lenoir County ? Advisory Committees: a member of the core research team will be represented at meeting(s) of the Lenoir County Alliance for a Healthy Community, at least once a year;when needed, we will add our research project to the meeting agendas for the Executive Committee of Community Campus Partnership for Tomorrow and NC TraCS Institute Oiscowfy Relationship of the proposed CPHHD to other research, academic and administrative units As depicted and described above, HPDP interacts with all 5 health affairs schools on campus. At the same time, HPDP projects partner with 63 state and local organizations and work in 97 of North Carolina's 100 counties. HPDP, as Prevention Research Center, has particularly strong relationships with state and local health departments, and Dr. Ammerman serves on the advisory board for the Public Health Practice Based Research Network in North Carolina. The diagram depicts two key institutional relationships within UNC: the NC TraCS Institute, and the Community Campus Partnership. Each is described briefly below and in more detail in the Center section. NC TraCS - UNC's Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) UNC-Chapel Hill received a Clinical and Translational Sciences Award in May 2008. The North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute (NC TraCS) is the academic home of the CTSA, a national consortium of 39 academic medical research institutions funded through and led by the National Centerfor Research Resources at the National Institutes of Health. The NC TraCS mission is to transform all activities relating to clinical and translational research by creating new programs and pathways that make it easier for research to be performed at UNC and throughout the State of North Carolina. Overreaching goals are: ? To enable teams of interdisciplinary researchers to create, innovate, and translate discoveries into advancements in the health of both individual patients (Tl) and populations (T2); ? To develop innovative programs for education, training and career development; ? To participate in targeted faculty recruitment; ? To provide $4.3 million per year in pilot project funding with a particular focus on building new interdisciplinary research teams, supporting the efforts of junior faculty members, spreading new technologies to the community through outreach and commercialization;and, ? To collaborate with and increase partnership activities across the State.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Specialized Center (P50)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-SRLB-3)
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University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill
United States
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