The primary goal of the Administrative Core is to focus and integrate the distributed research performed by the individual projects comprising the Center. The Administrative Core will streamline research activities, facilitate intellectual exchange and data sharing, and strengthen existing and forge new relationships with local training and outreach organizations. The Administrative Core will provide for the organizational, financial, and central informational needs ofthe overall center. These functions serve to tie the various laboratories and participants together into a common unit The personnel of this core have extensive experience in the management of center grants and the conduct of large-scale research efforts.
Specific aim #1 ofthe Administrative core is to meet all administrative requirements ofthe individual Research Projects and the other Core Unit.
Specific Aim #2 of the Administrative Core is to support the close collaboration between the participants and Projects in this Center, ensuring that: 1) the objectives of the Center are fully aligned with NIMH strategy, 2) clinical discoveries made within the Center will have a significant impact on the preclinical projects, 3) the scientific observations made in the preclinical projects will impact the direction of research in other Projects and that all study results are integrated into ongoing research, and 4) there is a flexible, rapid and appropriate response to emerging data.
Specific Aim #3 of the Administrative Core is to build a pipeline for individuals interested in a research career in a Conte Center research area;to encourage diversity ofthe workforce, to facilitate the transition of individuals to research independence, and to promote community outreach.

Public Health Relevance

The primary goal of the Administrative Core is to focus and integrate the distributed research performed by the individual projects comprising this Conte Center. The Administrative Core will streamline research activities, facilitate intellectual exchange and data sharing, and strengthen existing and forge new relationships with local training and outreach organizations.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
1P50MH100023-01
Application #
8657304
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1-ERB-L (02))
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$149,522
Indirect Cost
$65,756
Name
Emory University
Department
Type
DUNS #
066469933
City
Atlanta
State
GA
Country
United States
Zip Code
30322
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