This renewal application requests five years of funding for continuation of the multidisciplinary biomedical research and resource program at the New England Primate Research Center (NEPRC). Detailed plans are presented for the support of meritorious research which will contribute to the understanding and solution of human health problems using nonhuman primates, as mandated by NIH. We describe the research programs, collaborative activities, core services, and pilot research programs within seven scientific units at NEPRC: Behavioral Biology, Comparative Pathology, Immunology, Microbiology, Neurochemistry, Primate Resources, and Tumor Virology. The research activities and core services within these seven units are intently focused on major public health challenges, principally AIDS treatment and prevention, viral-induced cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and drug addiction. The nature of the research program is fundamentally basic in some cases, applied in others. The research programs and support services are also highly collaborative in nature, usually involving contributions from multiple scientific units from within and outside NEPRC. The core and service activities funded by NEPRC's base grant are currently supporting $10.1 million in NIH-funded research to intramural NEPRC investigators and $268 million in NIH-funded research to extramural nonNEPRC investigators. Additionally, this proposal seeks to (1) enhance the Center's ability to serve as a regional, national and international resource for collaborative, affiliated and visiting scientists by providing specialized facilities, equipment and technological expertise, (2) enhance the availability of non-human primates for use in biomedical research, (3) train young investigators, and (4) provide the administrative, scientific and primate resources infrastructure necessary to maintain and operate a Center. Also included in this application is a five year Modernization Program. The New England Primate Research Center, Harvard Medical School, is fully accredited by AAALAC International.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Office of The Director, National Institutes of Health (OD)
Type
Primate Research Center Grants (P51)
Project #
8P51OD011103-51
Application #
8294852
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-CM-8 (01))
Program Officer
Harding, John D
Project Start
1997-05-01
Project End
2014-04-30
Budget Start
2012-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
51
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$12,739,167
Indirect Cost
$2,804,061
Name
Harvard University
Department
Veterinary Sciences
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
047006379
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02115
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