This proposed study (R01;PA-07-070) will examine the heterogeneity of victimization, its'relationship with substance use and psychological distress, as well as the combined affect of these factors on the health seeking process among victimized women in the criminal justice (CJ) system.
Study aims are to 1) identify and characterize latent class trajectories based on victimization, substance use, and psychological distress among 400 victimized women on probation and parole;2) determine the extent to which women in the identified trajectory classes vary, over a two year time period, in levels of risk and protection in the health seeking process;and 3) examine the theory based components of the health seeking process among 400 victimized women on probation and parole. Findings from this research will be used to identify those groups of women that are most at risk for engagement in high risk behaviors (current drug use;psychological distress;HIV risk behavior;lawbreaking and continued CJ involvement) and to identify and characterize their associated levels of risk and protection in the health seeking process across a two year time period. Study findings will provide a theoretically guided understanding of the relationship among the component parts of the health seeking process that affect engagement in high risk behavior, over time, among this population. These data are necessary prerequisites to the development of tailored intervention strategies that target specific groups of women within the CJ system;these data can provide practitioners, administrators and policy makers with direct information about which groups of women will be most amenable to which intervention/prevention approaches. Study findings have the potential to have broad relevance within the CJ system and other care systems (e.g. substance abuse and mental health treatment systems) that provide services to this marginalized and growing population.

Public Health Relevance

The confluence of race and class among women in the CJ system means that increases in this population disproportionately affect the health and well-being of women of color, particularly poor women of color;the increased involvement of women in the CJ system has perpetuated and fueled racial disparities and biases in the areas of child well-being and the child welfare system, infectious diseases and other markers of public health, and other domains of psychosocial functioning such as employment and educational attainment. Results of this study will contribute directly to the development of targeted intervention strategies to address the needs of this population;study results will allow for the identification of those groups of victimized women in the CJ system that are most at risk for engagement in high risk behaviors (current drug use;psychological distress;HIV risk behavior;lawbreaking and continued CJ involvement) and to characterize their associated levels of risk and protection in the health seeking process across time. Results will also provide a theoretically guided understanding of the health seeking process by which these women come to engage in high risk behavior.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01DA027981-03
Application #
8221004
Study Section
Community Influences on Health Behavior (CIHB)
Program Officer
Deeds, Bethany
Project Start
2010-04-01
Project End
2015-02-28
Budget Start
2012-03-01
Budget End
2013-02-28
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$310,497
Indirect Cost
$96,393
Name
University of Louisville
Department
None
Type
Schools of Social Work
DUNS #
057588857
City
Louisville
State
KY
Country
United States
Zip Code
40292
Golder, Seana; Hall, Martin T; Logan, T K et al. (2014) Substance use among victimized women on probation and parole. Subst Use Misuse 49:435-47