Physical health problems, including obesity, increase in the 30s, and substance use, depression, and anxiety disorders remain prevalent and often co-occur and accompany physical health problems. This study investigates the interrelationships among these problems by augmenting data from the Seattle Social Development Project (SSDP), a gender-balanced, multiethnic sample of 808 followed from age 10 through age 35. The study examines the health effects of two broad environmental domains: the social environment - defined by social interactions and developmental experiences hypothesized to affect health through positive adult functioning (in marriage, parenthood, career, community, etc.);and the built environment - defined by a neighborhood's physical features hypothesized to affect health through physical activity. The diverse sample also provides an opportunity to investigate environmental factors and mechanisms that can explain disparities in health outcomes by gender, ethnicity, and economic status. New objective measures of the built environment, physical activity, and health outcomes at age 39 are added to 14 waves of prospective data including assessments of social development throughout, and diagnostic assessments of drug abuse, mental disorders, and physical health collected every three years from age 21 through age 35. Our goal is to understand the mechanisms linking social and built environments to interrelated health problems in the 30s, including sexually transmitted infections, and the contribution of these mechanisms to explaining health disparities.

Public Health Relevance

This study investigates the interrelationships among physical health problems, including increasing rates of obesity, and substance use, depression, and anxiety disorders in the 30s. The study examines the health effects of two broad environmental domains: the social environment - defined by social interactions and developmental experiences;and the built environment - defined by a neighborhood's physical features. The goal of the study is to understand the mechanisms linking social and built environments to interrelated health problems in the 30s, including sexually transmitted infections, and the contribution of these mechanisms to explaining disparities in health outcomes by gender, ethnicity, and economic status.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01DA033956-02
Application #
8628096
Study Section
Community Influences on Health Behavior (CIHB)
Program Officer
Etz, Kathleen
Project Start
2013-03-01
Project End
2017-11-30
Budget Start
2013-12-01
Budget End
2014-11-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$465,940
Indirect Cost
$93,121
Name
University of Washington
Department
None
Type
Schools of Social Work
DUNS #
605799469
City
Seattle
State
WA
Country
United States
Zip Code
98195
Kosterman, Rick; Hill, Karl G; Lee, Jungeun Olivia et al. (2014) Young adult social development as a mediator of alcohol use disorder symptoms from age 21 to 30. Psychol Addict Behav 28:348-58