Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a brain disease that causes a gradual and increasingly more debilitating impairment of word usage and comprehension. Although it is being recognized with increasing frequency, PPA remains underserved with respect to research and patient services. This application seeks continued funding for a project that is the centerpiece of a comprehensive PPA Research Program at Northwestern University. The goal is to make maximal use of a unique cohort that has been recruited during the first 5 years of the project and to enroll new patients for hypothesis-driven investigations of naming, word comprehension, incidental memory and sentence processing with novel tasks designed by a multidisciplinary team of investigators with a track record of close collaboration and high productivity in PPA. We believe that this type of research program can best be achieved within the structure of a multidisciplinary approach such as the one we have established for this purpose, led by researchers in neuroimaging (Dr. Emily Rogalski), neurolinguistics (Dr. Cynthia Thompson), event-related potentials (Dr. Ken Paller), neuropsychology (Dr. Sandra Weintraub), neurobehavior (Dr. Marsel Mesulam), biostatistics (Dr. Alfred Rademaker) and Magnetic Resonance physics (Dr. Todd Parrish). For the next cycle, we chose specific aims that address the four core themes of this project: subtyping and temporal evolution of PPA, mechanisms of naming and semantic distortions, characteristics of fluency and grammatical competence, and anatomical substrates of language as inferred from the distribution of peak atrophy sites in patients. Within this framework, our primary aims will be 1. To complete a longitudinal study of a select subset of current participants in order to delineat the natural course of PPA and to characterize the evolution of its initial stages (Experiment 1). 2 To clarify the mechanisms of anomia with a cross-modal ERP experiment (Experiment 2). 3. To investigate dynamic perturbations of verb and sentence processing with on-line tasks using the methodology of ERP and eye movement recording (Experiments 3 and 4). 4. To identify the anatomical basis of material- and modality-specific distortions of learning in PPA (Experiment 5). 5. To foster the continued development of the International PPA Connection (IMPPACT) website, launched through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), as an international collaborative patient and resource registry (ppaconnection.org).

Public Health Relevance

Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a brain disease that causes a gradual and increasingly more debilitating impairment of word usage and comprehension. Although it is being recognized with increasing frequency, PPA remains underserved with respect to research and patient services. This application seeks continued funding for a project that is the centerpiece of a comprehensive PPA Research Program at Northwestern University.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01DC008552-07
Application #
8466306
Study Section
Language and Communication Study Section (LCOM)
Program Officer
Cooper, Judith
Project Start
2007-05-05
Project End
2017-04-30
Budget Start
2013-05-01
Budget End
2014-04-30
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$591,846
Indirect Cost
$208,774
Name
Northwestern University at Chicago
Department
Neurology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
005436803
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60611
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Mesulam, M-Marsel; Weintraub, Sandra (2014) Is it time to revisit the classification guidelines for primary progressive aphasia? Neurology 82:1108-9
Rogalski, Emily; Cobia, Derin; Martersteck, Adam et al. (2014) Asymmetry of cortical decline in subtypes of primary progressive aphasia. Neurology 83:1184-91
Mesulam, M-Marsel; Weintraub, Sandra; Rogalski, Emily J et al. (2014) Asymmetry and heterogeneity of Alzheimer's and frontotemporal pathology in primary progressive aphasia. Brain 137:1176-92
Weintraub, Sandra; Dikmen, Sureyya S; Heaton, Robert K et al. (2014) The cognition battery of the NIH toolbox for assessment of neurological and behavioral function: validation in an adult sample. J Int Neuropsychol Soc 20:567-78
Olofsson, Jonas K; Hurley, Robert S; Bowman, Nicholas E et al. (2014) A designated odor-language integration system in the human brain. J Neurosci 34:14864-73
Rogalski, Emily J; Rademaker, Alfred; Wieneke, Christina et al. (2014) Association between the prevalence of learning disabilities and primary progressive aphasia. JAMA Neurol 71:1576-7
Olofsson, Jonas K; Rogalski, Emily; Harrison, Theresa et al. (2013) A cortical pathway to olfactory naming: evidence from primary progressive aphasia. Brain 136:1245-59
Weintraub, Sandra; Rogalski, Emily; Shaw, Emily et al. (2013) Verbal and nonverbal memory in primary progressive aphasia: the Three Words-Three Shapes Test. Behav Neurol 26:67-76
Mack, Jennifer E; Cho-Reyes, Soojin; Kloet, James D et al. (2013) Phonological facilitation of object naming in agrammatic and logopenic primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Cogn Neuropsychol 30:172-93

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