It has recently become appreciated that ribosomal peptide natural products (RiPPs) represent one of the major groups of bioactive natural products on Earth. The compounds are found nearly universally in bacteria, where they place diverse roles including quorum signaling, cofactor synthesis, and chemical defense. Most commonly, RiPPs exhibit potent antibiotic activity. They are key players in modern drug discovery and development. Perhaps more importantly, RiPPs present an enormous storehouse of posttranslational machinery that can be used to design drug-like compounds. They are readily manipulated for the rational engineering and optimization of desired properties. In this proposal, we will use this diverse RiPP biosynthetic machinery to better understand posttranslational enzymes, to optimize and engineer production platforms, and to develop technologies to better harness these complex pathways in the design and discovery of new antibiotics.
Our specific aims are to: 1) Characterize unique RiPP posttranslational enzymes using chemical, biochemical, and genetic methods;2) Improve compound production and analog synthesis in heterologous hosts;3) Discover new antibiotics by implementing novel bioassays.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
1R01GM102602-01A1
Application #
8506633
Study Section
Synthetic and Biological Chemistry B Study Section (SBCB)
Program Officer
Gerratana, Barbara
Project Start
2013-04-01
Project End
2017-03-31
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$360,448
Indirect Cost
$100,714
Name
University of Utah
Department
Pharmacology
Type
Schools of Pharmacy
DUNS #
009095365
City
Salt Lake City
State
UT
Country
United States
Zip Code
84112
Dunbar, Kyle L; Chekan, Jonathan R; Cox, Courtney L et al. (2014) Discovery of a new ATP-binding motif involved in peptidic azoline biosynthesis. Nat Chem Biol 10:823-9