Early detection of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) has come to be recognized as a crucial activity in promoting the best possible outcome for affected children. In our current NICHD-funded Early Detection (ED) study, for which this application is a competing continuation, we have developed an effective screening instrument, the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT), which is now widely used in the US, and is being studied in translation in other countries and cultures, including Japan, China, Spain, the Netherlands, France, Iceland, Ireland, Germany, Egypt, Puerto Rico and Turkey. It is being used by the Indian Health Service and is included in the American Academy of Pediatrics screening tool kit. In addition to studying the properties of this screening instrument, studying our current cohort of 16-30 month old children detected with the M-CHAT and diagnosed with ASD, has allowed us to address other questions of great theoretical and practical importance concerning early detection and development, including: characteristics of children with ASD screened from high risk vs. unselected samples, characteristics of younger siblings of children with ASD detected at age 1.5 to 2, early predictors of outcome, the application of DSM-IV symptoms to very young children, diagnostic stability through early childhood, validity of diagnostic instruments in 2-year-olds, growth parameters in early development and their relationships to outcome, and whether general developmental screening is sufficient to detect ASD. The overarching goal of this continuation is to validate a final shortened revision of the M-CHAT. This final version will be (a) brief and user-friendly, (b) easy for pediatricians to score in their offices, (c) valid for diverse populations of children, (d) valid for younger siblings, who are at high risk, and (e) ready to be recommended for universal pediatric use in the US, as well as in multiple translations in other countries. Disseminating a finalized, valid screener for early detection of ASD, which is parent- and pediatrician-friendly, will allow a large number of children to have earlier access to intervention and optimize their developmental outcomes.

Public Health Relevance

The goal of this project is to validate a final shortened revision of the M-CHAT, a screener for autism in toddlers. This final version will be (a) brief and user-friendly, (b) easy for pediatricians to score in their offices, (c) valid for diverse populations of children, (d) valid for younger siblings, who are at high risk, and (e) ready to be recommended for universal pediatric use in the US, as well as in multiple translations in other countries. Disseminating a finalized, valid screener for early detection of ASD, which is parent- and pediatrician-friendly, will allow a large number of children to have earlier access to intervention and optimize their developmental outcomes.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HD039961-10
Application #
8451592
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-BBBP-J (02))
Program Officer
Kau, Alice S
Project Start
2000-12-01
Project End
2014-03-31
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$924,542
Indirect Cost
$174,059
Name
University of Connecticut
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
614209054
City
Storrs-Mansfield
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06269
Troyb, Eva; Knoch, Kelley; Herlihy, Lauren et al. (2016) Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors as Predictors of Outcome in Autism Spectrum Disorders. J Autism Dev Disord 46:1282-96
Brooks, Bianca A; Haynes, Kiauhna; Smith, Joy et al. (2016) Implementation of Web-Based Autism Screening in an Urban Clinic. Clin Pediatr (Phila) 55:927-34
Moulton, Emily; Barton, Marianne; Robins, Diana L et al. (2016) Early Characteristics of Children with ASD Who Demonstrate Optimal Progress Between Age Two and Four. J Autism Dev Disord 46:2160-73
Fein, Deborah; Baby Sibs Research Consortium (2016) Commentary on USPSTF Final Statement on Universal Screening for Autism. J Dev Behav Pediatr 37:573-8
Moulton, Emily; Bradbury, Kathryn; Barton, Marianne et al. (2016) Factor Analysis of the Childhood Autism Rating Scale in a Sample of Two Year Olds with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. J Autism Dev Disord :
Bradstreet, Lauren E; Juechter, Julia I; Kamphaus, Randy W et al. (2016) Using the BASC-2 Parent Rating Scales to Screen for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Toddlers and Preschool-Aged Children. J Abnorm Child Psychol :
Suma, Katharine; Adamson, Lauren B; Bakeman, Roger et al. (2016) After Early Autism Diagnosis: Changes in Intervention and Parent-Child Interaction. J Autism Dev Disord 46:2720-33
Richards, Megan; Mossey, Jana; Robins, Diana L (2016) Parents' Concerns as They Relate to Their Child's Development and Later Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder. J Dev Behav Pediatr 37:532-40
Robins, Diana L; Adamson, Lauren B; Barton, Marianne et al. (2016) Universal Autism Screening for Toddlers: Recommendations at Odds. J Autism Dev Disord 46:1880-2
Gonsiorowski, Anna; Williamson, Rebecca A; Robins, Diana L (2016) Brief Report: Imitation of Object-Directed Acts in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. J Autism Dev Disord 46:691-7

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