Rates of infant death in Blacks have been two fold higher than for whites in the U.S. for nearly a century. As infants born preterm comprise the vast majority of infant deaths, research on the etiology of preterm birth is essential to lower the rate of infant mortality and to eliminate racial disparities. We hypothesize that a failure to rigorously and comprehensively consider racism as a fundamental factor has limited our understanding of the etiology of preterm birth among Black women. Exposure to racism, measured as perceptions of individuals or as characteristics of neighborhoods (e.g. segregation), has been shown to be associated with morbidity and mortality for Blacks in the U.S. While evidence connecting racism to adult health has expanded considerably in the past decade, only a small number of studies have explored the impact of racism on birth outcomes. We propose to study racism as a fundamental factor that may influence a woman in myriad ways that could increase her risk of preterm birth. We will consider racism not only prenatally but also across a woman's life course as empirical and theoretical work provides support for the influence of more distal exposures on birth outcomes. We recently developed a widely embraced framework for perinatal health that marries a multiple determinants model with a life course approach. Based on this framework, our conceptual model focuses on how racism and the factors that relate to it across the life course may influence preterm birth. We propose to measure responses to racism as we examine the effect of racism on preterm birth. First, we will use instruments that measure perceived racism across a woman's life course, including the current pregnancy. Second, we will collect a residential history in order to measure residential environment. The design for the study is a retrospective cohort identifying women at delivery. Data sources include maternal and grandmaternal interviews, medical record abstraction, and geocoded residential environment. Detailed data will be collected on the perceived racism and the social, psychosocial, ad biomedical factors that may mediate the influence of racism. Residential history will be collected and geocoded to enable linkage with data on neighborhood factors. Data on neighborhood perceived quality will also be collected in the interviews. The primary objective of this work is to determine whether and how risk of preterm birth relates to racism. If risks of preterm birth are rooted in experiences of racism, whether personally mediated, institutional, or internalized, current strategies aimed at improving pregnancy outcomes and eliminating disparities will need to be broadened to address the influence of racism in the U.S. The primary objective of this work is to determine whether and how risk of preterm birth relates to racism. This study may inform the development of future interventions. If risks of preterm birth are rooted in experiences of racism, whether personally mediated, institutional, or internalized, current strategies aimed at improving pregnancy outcomes and eliminating disparities will need to be broadened to address the influence of racism in the U.S. The research proposed here addresses Healthy People 2010 objective 16-11, ?Reducing preterm birth.?

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HD058510-04
Application #
8196972
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-RPHB-K (50))
Program Officer
Raju, Tonse N
Project Start
2008-12-15
Project End
2013-11-30
Budget Start
2011-12-01
Budget End
2012-11-30
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$473,325
Indirect Cost
$97,386
Name
Wayne State University
Department
Family Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
001962224
City
Detroit
State
MI
Country
United States
Zip Code
48202
Osypuk, Theresa L; Slaughter-Acey, Jaime C; Kehm, Rebecca D et al. (2016) Life-course Social Mobility and Reduced Risk of Adverse Birth Outcomes. Am J Prev Med 51:975-982
Slaughter-Acey, Jaime C; Sealy-Jefferson, Shawnita; Helmkamp, Laura et al. (2016) Racism in the form of micro aggressions and the risk of preterm birth among black women. Ann Epidemiol 26:7-13.e1
Osypuk, Theresa L; Kehm, Rebecca; Misra, Dawn P (2015) Where we used to live: validating retrospective measures of childhood neighborhood context for life course epidemiologic studies. PLoS One 10:e0124635
Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L et al. (2015) Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PLoS One 10:e0124595
Giurgescu, Carmen; Misra, Dawn P; Sealy-Jefferson, Shawnita et al. (2015) The impact of neighborhood quality, perceived stress, and social support on depressive symptoms during pregnancy in African American women. Soc Sci Med 130:172-80
Jiménez, Marcia P; Osypuk, Theresa L; Arevalo, Sandra et al. (2015) Neighborhood socioeconomic context and change in allostatic load among older Puerto Ricans: The Boston Puerto Rican health study. Health Place 33:1-8
Sealy-Jefferson, Shawnita; Giurgescu, Carmen; Helmkamp, Laura et al. (2015) Perceived Physical and Social Residential Environment and Preterm Delivery in African-American Women. Am J Epidemiol 182:485-93
Sealy-Jefferson, Shawnita; Hegner, Kristy; Misra, Dawn P (2014) Linking nontraditional physical activity and preterm delivery in urban African-American women. Womens Health Issues 24:e389-95
Osypuk, T L (2013) Future research directions for understanding neighborhood contributions to health disparities. Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique 61 Suppl 2:S61-8
Osypuk, Theresa L (2013) Invited commentary: integrating a life-course perspective and social theory to advance research on residential segregation and health. Am J Epidemiol 177:310-5

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