Recovery of motor function following stroke is usually suboptimal. Thus, we need to elucidate how the brain of patients with stroke works when we learn new motor behaviors. To this end, we propose to decompose motor learning into multiple components and test how brain stimulation affects each of these parts. The findings of our study will inform how we plan and deliver motor training exercises to rehabilitate patients with stroke. Importantly, the strategies learned here would likely be applicable to other neurological patient populations.

Public Health Relevance

Recovery of motor function following stroke is usually suboptimal. For this reason many investigations have been addressing how to enhance the effects of physical training, one of the main recognized interventions to improve recovery. One of the promising new interventions is the application of non-invasive brain stimulation. To better understand the potential of brain stimulation, we need to elucidate how the brain works when we learn new motor behaviors and how this intervention interacts with the brain. In this proposal, we plan to investigate how patients with stroke learn new motor behaviors. To this end, we propose to decompose motor learning into multiple components and test how brain stimulation affects each of these parts. The findings of our study will inform how we plan and deliver motor training exercises to rehabilitate patients with stroke. Importantly, the strategies learned here would likely be applicable to other neurological patient populations.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HD073147-03
Application #
8660705
Study Section
Motor Function, Speech and Rehabilitation Study Section (MFSR)
Program Officer
Nitkin, Ralph M
Project Start
2012-07-17
Project End
2017-04-30
Budget Start
2014-05-01
Budget End
2015-04-30
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$327,141
Indirect Cost
$115,587
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Physical Medicine & Rehab
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
Celnik, Pablo (2015) Understanding and modulating motor learning with cerebellar stimulation. Cerebellum 14:171-4
Celnik, Pablo; Birmbaumer, Niels (2014) "How much will I recover, doctor?" Some help with an ever-elusive answer. Neurology 82:192-3
Hardwick, Robert M; Celnik, Pablo A (2014) Cerebellar direct current stimulation enhances motor learning in older adults. Neurobiol Aging 35:2217-21
Cantarero, Gabriela; Tang, Byron; O'Malley, Rebecca et al. (2013) Motor learning interference is proportional to occlusion of LTP-like plasticity. J Neurosci 33:4634-41
Cantarero, Gabriela; Lloyd, Ashley; Celnik, Pablo (2013) Reversal of long-term potentiation-like plasticity processes after motor learning disrupts skill retention. J Neurosci 33:12862-9
Zeiler, Steven R; Krakauer, John W (2013) The interaction between training and plasticity in the poststroke brain. Curr Opin Neurol 26:609-16