Sleep disturbances are common in the general population, and women are a population at particular risk. Recent studies indicate a link between short sleep duration and sleep disturbances with adverse health risks. Evidence from physiological and epidemiological studies demonstrate an association between short sleep duration and an increased risk of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and mortality. In addition, specific sleep disorders, in particular sleep disordered breathing have been linked with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Despite the emerging evidence of the importance of sleep for health and data that sleep disturbances are common among pregnant women, there is a paucity of research on the potentially important link between sleep and maternal/ fetal outcomes, particularly metabolic and cardiovascular complications of pregnancy. Specifically, there is limited data on how insufficient sleep and sleep disorders may contribute to the development of gestational diabetes, gestational hypertension, and preeclampsia. We have identified a unique and timely opportunity to leverage the resources of the recently established Nulliparous Research Network of 10,000 pregnant women to address the relationship between sleep abnormalities (short sleep duration, poor sleep quality and common sleep disorders) and pregnancy outcomes. The overall hypothesis to be tested is that sleep disturbances are associated with an increase risk for cardiometabolic disorders during pregnancy. Specifically this application proposes to evaluate self-reported and objective sleep/wake characteristics in a large cohort of pregnant women from whom detailed cardiovascular and metabolic pregnancy outcomes will be measured from the first trimester to delivery.
The specific aims are: 1) To systematically characterize sleep patterns using survey and actigraphy in a large cohort of pregnant women;2) To determine the relationships between abnormal sleep patterns (sleep quality and sleep disorders) and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders of pregnancy (gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes);3) To determine concordance between self-reported measures of sleep and objectively derived sleep measures (using actigraphy) in a pregnant population. This application will provide the first large scale longitudinal assessment of sleep in a pregnant population and determine the relationship between sleep characteristics and disorders with pregnancy outcomes. The results of this study have the potential to inform and change clinical care to improve pregnancy outcomes.

Public Health Relevance

Disturbed sleep is common among pregnant women and few studies have evaluated sleep in pregnancy or examined maternal and fetal outcomes in women with sleep disturbances. Given the link between sleep disturbances and metabolic and cardiovascular complications, of which pregnant women are at particular risk, there is a great need for such a study. The current application will seize the unique opportunity to leverage the resources of the recently established Nulliparous Research Network to study the relationship between sleep abnormalities and pregnancy outcomes;specifically this application proposes to evaluate self-reported and objective sleep/wake characteristics in a large cohort of pregnant women from whom detailed cardiovascular and metabolic pregnancy outcomes will be measured. This study will form the basis for future studies to determine whether screening for and treatment of sleep disturbances during pregnancy is an effective strategy to improve pregnancy outcomes.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01HL105549-02
Application #
8264972
Study Section
Cardiovascular and Sleep Epidemiology (CASE)
Program Officer
Twery, Michael
Project Start
2011-06-01
Project End
2014-04-30
Budget Start
2012-05-01
Budget End
2013-04-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$645,070
Indirect Cost
$64,266
Name
Northwestern University at Chicago
Department
Neurology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
005436803
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60611
Videnovic, Aleksandar; Noble, Charleston; Reid, Kathryn J et al. (2014) Circadian melatonin rhythm and excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson disease. JAMA Neurol 71:463-9
Facco, Francesca L; Liu, Cici S; Cabello, Andrea A et al. (2012) Sleep-disordered breathing: a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes? Am J Perinatol 29:277-82