The primary aim of the proposed competing continuation of Community partnerships to prevent urban youth health risks (the CHAMPions. CHAMP In Our NeighborhoodS - Project;R01 MH069934;PI: McKay) is to advance scientific knowledge about research/community partnerships that can serve as the foundation for local adaptation, delivery, and testing of evidence-based HIV prevention programs for inner-city African American and Latino adolescents. The proposed continuation aims: 1)To examine the response of the existing cohort of collaboratively trained community parent HIV educators in the experimental condition of CHAMPions (n=88) to the invitation to expand their role and become mentors/supervisors for a new cohort of community parent HIV educators (n=300);2)To examine the impact of becoming a mentor on the same theoretically derived characteristics related to collaboration studied in CHAMPions originally by adding a fourth and fifth wave of data collection (30 to 48 month follow-up) 3) To examine the impact of community collaboration training and mentoring component for the new cohort of community parent HIV educators on the delivery of two additional HIV prevention programs, Reducing the Risk (Kirby et al., 1999) and Becoming a Responsible Teen (BART) (St. Lawrence et al., 1995), both CDC approved .programs that work. in contrast with the delivery of Be Proud! Be Responsible! (The intervention tested within the original CHAMPions Project);4) to examine the effect of the training/mentoring component combined with one of three evidence-based interventions on adolescent sexual risk behavior. In order to achieve these aims, the proposed project will involve the existing sample of urban community residents (n=88) who have already delivered Be Proud! Be Responsible! as mentors for a new cohort of community HIV educators. In addition, this existing sample (n=88) will be involved in two additional assessment interviews (30 and 48 month follow-up) to examine longitudinal response to ongoing HIV leadership. Next, a new sample of 300 new urban parents will be recruited and randomly assigned to training co-conducted by community-based mentors and university- trained research staff in one of three evidence-based, youth-focused HIV prevention programs, Reducing the Risk (n=100 new parent HIV educators nested within 4 Bronx middle/early high schools), Becoming a Responsible Teen (n=100 new parent HIV educators nested within 4 Bronx middle/early high schools), Be Proud! Be Responsible! (n=100 new parent HIV educators nested within 4 Bronx middle/early high schools) plus community collaborative training/mentoring using procedures and training materials developed as part of the original CHAMPions project. Following the training in each of the three study conditions, new parent HIV educators will return to a randomly assigned middle/high school (with only one of the three programs delivered within each of the schools) and be involved in the delivery of the program to 600 randomly selected youth, ages 12 to 15 years.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed study is relevant to the public health knowledge base by providing critical information concerning research/community partnerships that can serve as the foundation for local adaptation, delivery, and testing of evidence-based HIV prevention programs for inner-city African American and Latino adolescents.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01MH069934-08
Application #
8197905
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-HOP-X (50))
Program Officer
Kamath, Susannah M Allison
Project Start
2003-07-01
Project End
2012-11-30
Budget Start
2011-12-01
Budget End
2012-11-30
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$714,710
Indirect Cost
$293,052
Name
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Department
Psychiatry
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
078861598
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10029
Holloway, Ian W; Traube, Dorian E; Schrager, Sheree M et al. (2012) Effects of Sexual Expectancies on Early Sexualized Behavior Among Urban Minority Youth. J Soc Social Work Res 3:
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