Production of nanomaterials has increased continuously because of their unique physicochemical characteristics and extensive applications. There are great concerns for the potential health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles. Because of nanomaterials'small sizes and large surface areas, many studies have shown that the biological effects of nanomaterials are greater than bulk material of the same chemical composition. In 2005, the NIOSH recommended exposure limits of 1.5 mg/m3 for fine TiO2 and 0.1 mg/m3 for ultrafine TiO2, as time-weighted average concentrations (TWA) for up to 10 hr/day during a 40-hr work week. However, there are no suitable personal samplers capable of assessing the exposure level of ultrafine or nanoparticles. The overall objective of this study is to develop a personal sampler capable of collecting the ultrafine particles (nanoparticles) in the occupational environment. This sampler consists of a cyclone for respirable particle classification, a polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) membrane filter with an acceleration nozzle to achieve nanoparticle classification, and a backup filter to collect nanoparticles. By applying high and localized filtration velocity in the nozzle, diffusion deposition of nanoparticles can be avoided in the classifying PCTE filter, and nanoparticles can be collected in the downstream backup filter. This research will lead to the development of a unique personal sampling device capable of classifying the nanoparticle fraction (d 100 nm) from the aerosol stream and collecting this fraction for gravimetric, chemical, and other analyses. This device can be used to accurately assess personal exposure to nanoparticles in terms of mass concentration and physicochemical characteristics.

Public Health Relevance

The overall objective is to develop a personal sampler capable of collecting the ultrafine particle (nanoparticle) fraction of the aerosol in an occupation environment. It can be used to assess personal exposure to nanoparticles in terms of mass concentration and physicochemical characteristics.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
Type
Research Project (R01)
Project #
5R01OH009801-03
Application #
8288610
Study Section
Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOH)
Program Officer
Potula, Viji
Project Start
2010-09-01
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$481,605
Indirect Cost
$235,492
Name
Lovelace Biomedical & Environmental Research
Department
Type
DUNS #
045911138
City
Albuquerque
State
NM
Country
United States
Zip Code
87108
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Zhou, Yue; Irshad, Hammad; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn et al. (2014) Evaluation of a novel personal nanoparticle sampler. Environ Sci Process Impacts 16:203-10
Cheng, Yung Sung; Su, Wei-Chung (2013) Thoracic fraction of inhaled fiber aerosol. J Occup Environ Hyg 10:194-202