Clinical psychologists and psychiatrists have come to emphasize the importance of effort-related symptoms, such as anergia, apathy, and fatigue, in major depression. Nevertheless, despite the large number of tests that are currently available for the assessment of antidepressant drugs in animal models, none of the widely used tasks is specifically focused upon effort-related functions in animals. Over the last few years, our laboratory has developed behavioral models in animals that are useful for assessing the role of various neurotransmitters, such as dopamine (DA) and adenosine, in the exertion of effort and effort-related choice behavior. Considerable evidence indicates that these basic studies in animals are potentially relevant for understanding effort-related dysfunction in humans. However, it is critical to determine if these procedures can lead to the development of novel models of the effort- related symptoms of depression. For these reasons, the goal of the proposed investigation is to study the ability of several conditions that are related to depression to induce effort-related dysfunctions in rats. One group of studies will assess the effects of low doses of the monoamine-depleting agent reserpine on tasks involving exertion of effort and effort-related choice behavior. Additional experiments will study the behavioral characteristics of two genetic models of depression (Congenitally Helpless Rats;Flinders Sensitive line rats). The final group of studies will assess the effects of a novel treatment strategy for depression (adenosine A2A antagonists) and two well known drugs (bupropion and fluoxetine), using behavioral models of effort-related function. The proposed experiments are designed to test the feasibility of using these procedures as potential models of the effort-related symptoms of depression and other disorders.

Public Health Relevance

Organisms are separated from significant stimuli such as food by environmental constraints or obstacles, and therefore motivated behaviors often are characterized by a high degree of vigor, persistence and work output. Moreover, organisms continually make effort-related decisions based upon cost/benefit analyses. In the clinical literature, psychiatrists and psychologists have come to emphasize the importance of energy-related dysfunctions, such as anergia and fatigue, in major depression, Parkinsonism and other disorders. It is critical to determine if animal procedures can lead to the development of novel models of the effort-related symptoms of depression. For these reasons, the goal of the proposed investigation is to study the ability of pharmacological and genetic conditions that are related to depressive symptoms to induce effort-related dysfunctions in rats. It is vital to study the brain mechanisms that are involved in effort-related processes, because such studies provide information about a fundamental aspect of motivation, and also because they could lead to the development of novel treatments for fatigue-related disorders.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Small Research Grants (R03)
Project #
1R03MH094966-01A1
Application #
8303557
Study Section
Pathophysiological Basis of Mental Disorders and Addictions Study Section (PMDA)
Program Officer
Winsky, Lois M
Project Start
2012-02-15
Project End
2014-01-31
Budget Start
2012-02-15
Budget End
2013-01-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$76,752
Indirect Cost
$26,752
Name
University of Connecticut
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
614209054
City
Storrs-Mansfield
State
CT
Country
United States
Zip Code
06269
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Yohn, Samantha E; Collins, Samantha L; Contreras-Mora, Hector M et al. (2016) Not All Antidepressants Are Created Equal: Differential Effects of Monoamine Uptake Inhibitors on Effort-Related Choice Behavior. Neuropsychopharmacology 41:686-94
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Randall, Patrick A; Lee, Christie A; Podurgiel, Samantha J et al. (2014) Bupropion increases selection of high effort activity in rats tested on a progressive ratio/chow feeding choice procedure: implications for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms. Int J Neuropsychopharmacol 18:
Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Podurgiel, Samantha et al. (2013) Nucleus accumbens neurotransmission and effort-related choice behavior in food motivation: effects of drugs acting on dopamine, adenosine, and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Neurosci Biobehav Rev 37:2015-25
Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercè (2013) Dopamine and food addiction: lexicon badly needed. Biol Psychiatry 73:e15-24
Nunes, Eric J; Randall, Patrick A; Hart, Evan E et al. (2013) Effort-related motivational effects of the VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine: implications for animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression. J Neurosci 33:19120-30

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