(provided by applic) Over the past two decades, it has been increasingly recognized that the risk of adult health disorders can be markedly influenced by prenatal and infant environmental and pharmaceutical exposures. The New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center are jointly presenting a 1.5- day scientific symposium to explore recent discoveries, challenges, and future research directions that further our understanding of the complex environmental and genetic factors, and gene-gene and gene- environment interactions responsible for fetal programming in utero and pre-term birth. Organized by Drs. Sudhansu K. Dey, Jeffrey A. Whitsett, and Susan J. Fisher (investigators), this event will take place at the New York Academy of Sciences conference center in New York City on June 7-8, 2012. The goals of the symposium are to: (i) discuss genetic and epigenetic factors, in addition to environmental exposures in the intrauterine environment that have a profound effect on the trajectory of prenatal development and pre-term birth, including the effects on: implantation;placentation;organogenesis;and neonatal health, and how to combat these effects;(ii) foster and highlight the research contributions of young and minority investigators working in this field;and (iii) develop high-quality, open-access, web-based enduring materials, to disseminate the latest scientific findings from this fast-moving field to the global community. The conference agenda features a Keynote Address, plenary lectures with audience questions and discussion, breakout roundtable discussions, a panel discussion, and networking activities. We anticipate wide participation (200 attendees) by toxicologists, obstetricians, neonatologists, pediatricians, nurse specialists, endocrinologists, epidemiologists, public health and regulatory experts from basic research to clinical settings, including experts in embryonic, fetal, and childhood development, reproductive medicine and biology, and environmental toxicology. The incorporation of poster and short oral presentations by junior investigators selected from submitted abstracts, and the availability of discounted registration prices and travel fellowships will encourage participation of qualified junior investigators, fellos, physicians-in- training, graduate students, and post-docs to attend the conference. We will use targeted marketing to encourage women and minority scientists to apply for these fellowships and to participate in the conference. The discussions originating from this forum and their dissemination will foster cross-disciplinary dialogue and collaborations among complementary research and clinical groups and lead to enhanced translation of research discoveries into: (i) improved understanding of the factors involved in fetal programming in utero and pre-term birth;(ii) the identification of ways in which to predict, assess, and lower the risk of and/or prevent environmental and genetic factors that predispose to adverse fetal outcomes and pre-term birth;and (iii) related, new health and safety guidelines, and public health programs for families and children. 1

Public Health Relevance

Prenatal and infant environmental and pharmaceutical exposures can adversely influence fetal programming, which plays a role in pre-term birth and lasting adverse effects on pulmonary, renal, and cerebral function, behavior and learning disabilities, and vision and hearing loss and is linked to chronic adult conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease. The 1.5-day scientific symposium presented by the New York Academy of Sciences and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center will provide a neutral forum for toxicologists, obstetricians, neonatologists, pediatricians nurse specialists, endocrinologists, epidemiologists, and public health and regulatory experts from basic research to clinical settings to explore recent discoveries regarding the complex array of environmental (chemical, pharmaceutical or environmental) and genetic factors responsible for fetal programming in utero and pre-term birth. This forum will generate enduring, open-access, online publications to highlight the effects of environmental exposures on embryonic, fetal, and childhood development and reproductive medicine and biology, and will be available to the global scientific community in perpetuity. Thus, this activity will foster cross-disciplinary dialogue and collaboration and promote the development of effective clinical interventions and guidelines, preventive strategies, and new policies to lower the risk of and/or prevent environmental and genetic interactions that predispose to adverse fetal outcomes and pre-term birth.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Conference (R13)
Project #
1R13ES021699-01
Application #
8319101
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-TN-J (K))
Program Officer
Heindel, Jerrold
Project Start
2012-08-07
Project End
2013-06-30
Budget Start
2012-08-07
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$14,000
Indirect Cost
Name
New York Academy of Sciences
Department
Type
DUNS #
075232751
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10007