The increasing use of engineered nanomaterials in industrial and consumer applications has raised serious concerns about their environment health safety (EH&S). A particular concern is for occupational exposure to raw materials in the form of highly dispersed spherical and fiber- like shapes. Researchers seek to quantify nanomaterial interactions with biological systems and to develop predictive models of nanoparticle EH&S risk. However, limitations imposed by the model systems employed, the lack of NP standards, the failure of researchers to quantify or report the physiochemical properties of the NP investigated, and the inadequate availability of sensitive analytical instrumentation, have collectively hampered progress in attaining these EH&S goals. In the proposed project we seek to overcome limitations in detecting nanoparticles by developing a set of reagents (NProbes) that will enhance their presence in biological tissues that due to their size may be obscured from detection by other means. NProbe reagents will function in a similar fashion to those used to detect and quantify proteins in standard immunohistological analysis. NProbes with high binding affinity to both raw NP and transformed nanomaterials will be generated using protein-based (antibody and fibronectin) phage display technology. Nanomaterials of interest include carbon nanotubes, metal oxides, metals, and semiconductors. We will validate the binding of NProbes to raw nanomaterials and test their cross reactivity to samples of related and dissimilar composition. NProbe binding to nanomaterials transformed by penetration through skin will be also be demonstrated. We believe that NProbe reagents will be useful to researchers assessing nanoparticles tissue interactions in all mammalian, vertebrate, invertebrates systems as well as detection of nanoparticles in the environment. Successfully development of NProbe reagents will have a transformative effect on nanoparticle risk assessment research.

Public Health Relevance

Over the past few years the use of engineered nanomaterials in industrial and consumer applications has accelerated, raising serious concerns about the environment health safety (EH&S) risk from nanoparticle exposure. Limitations imposed by inadequate availability of sensitive analytical instrumentation have contributed to gaps in our ability to quantify the fate and transport of engineered nanomaterials. In this proposed project we address this issue by developing a set of reagents (NProbes) that will enable detection of nanoparticles skin and in other biological or environmental systems. NProbe reagents will function in a similar fashion to those used to detect and quantify proteins in standard immunohistological analysis. NProbes with high binding affinity to both raw NP and transformed nanomaterials will be generated using protein-based (antibody and fibronectin) phage display technology.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
Type
Exploratory/Developmental Grants (R21)
Project #
5R21OH009970-02
Application #
8325876
Study Section
Safety and Occupational Health Study Section (SOH)
Program Officer
Potula, Viji
Project Start
2011-09-01
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$217,848
Indirect Cost
$76,846
Name
University of Rochester
Department
Dermatology
Type
Schools of Dentistry
DUNS #
041294109
City
Rochester
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
14627
Jatana, Samreen; DeLouise, Lisa A (2014) Understanding engineered nanomaterial skin interactions and the modulatory effects of ultraviolet radiation skin exposure. Wiley Interdiscip Rev Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 6:61-79
DeLouise, Lisa A (2012) Applications of nanotechnology in dermatology. J Invest Dermatol 132:964-75