The proposed Oregon Health and Science University R25 program ("Translational Training in Biomedical Imaging Research") will provide an immersive training experience for selected residents in the methodology and performance of biomedical imaging research for one year during residency, after which participants will enter an innovative two year clinical fellowship program at OHSU with protected academic time (20-40%) dedicated to research. Team mentoring will be provided by drawing together experienced research supervisors from faculty members in radiology, other clinical specialties, and basic sciences. These teams will comprise an experienced and expert group of research scientists engaged in the development and applications of a comprehensive array of imaging methods for biomedical applications. While the program is linked to a novel six year structure of combined residency and fellowship, which aligns with ongoing changes in the American Board of Radiology exam structure and the current tough radiology job market, only the dedicated research year will be funded by R25 funds. We plan to take promising young trainees and "jumpstart" their academic careers by providing them with a multidisciplinary and mentored research exposure early in their training, with the broad long term goal of improving imaging detection, monitoring, and treatment of disease by producing a cadre of physicians who will become independent clinical scientific investigators and future leaders in academic biomedical imaging. That is, the overarching purpose of the program is to produce skilled academic radiologists by providing a facilitated transition between residency/fellowship and academic faculty positions in Radiology. Such individuals are crucial for the continued evolution of biomedical imaging. Radiologists are uniquely positioned to be the cornerstone in multidisciplinary biomedical research, but they can only fulfill this role if adequately trained, prepared, and skilled in building and developing interdisciplinary teams. In addition, we plan to give special attention to the recruitment and training of residents from under-represented minorities or with disabilities or other social, cultural, economic, or educational disadvantages, since OHSU recognizes the importance of diversity in enriching the institutional culture and fulfilling the wider-ranging mission of the campus. A relatively broad theme has been deliberately chosen for this program, so trainees can pursue any of a wide and flexible range of research options within the multiple areas encompassed by biomedical imaging. A broad theme also capitalizes on one of the core strengths of our institution, namely, the breadth and diversity of the research activities and interests at OHSU and the wide spectrum of available imaging facilities and resources. A common core training block of coursework in research methodology, biostatistics, and biomedical imaging tools will provide those entering the training program with a shared foundation of knowledge. Trainees are mentored in the ethics and methods of biomedical research, as well as in grant writing and other important career skills.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed Oregon Health and Science University R25 program (Translational Training in Biomedical Imaging Research) will improve public healthcare by improving imaging detection, monitoring, and treatment of disease by producing a cadre of physicians who will become independent clinical scientific investigators and future leaders in academic biomedical imaging. We plan to take promising young trainees and jumpstart their academic careers by providing them with a multidisciplinary and mentored research exposure early in their training, with and so produce skilled academic radiologists by providing a facilitated transition between residency/fellowship and academic faculty positions in Radiology. Such individuals are crucial for the continued evolution of biomedical imaging, but they can only fulfill this role if adequately trained, prepared, and skilled in building and developing interdisciplinary teams.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB)
Type
Education Projects (R25)
Project #
3R25EB016671-02S1
Application #
8895604
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZEB1-OSR-D (J1))
Program Officer
Baird, Richard A
Project Start
2013-07-01
Project End
2018-06-30
Budget Start
2014-07-01
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$87,480
Indirect Cost
$6,480
Name
Oregon Health and Science University
Department
Radiation-Diagnostic/Oncology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
096997515
City
Portland
State
OR
Country
United States
Zip Code
97239
Didier, Ryne A; Vajtai, Petra L; Hopkins, Katharine L (2015) Iterative reconstruction technique with reduced volume CT dose index: diagnostic accuracy in pediatric acute appendicitis. Pediatr Radiol 45:181-7
Coakley, Fergus V; Grant, Michael John; Behr, Spencer et al. (2014) Imaging of invasive thymoma in the costophrenic recess presenting as thickening of arcuate ligaments of the diaphragm. Clin Imaging 38:529-31
Ghazizadeh, S; Foss, E W; Didier, R et al. (2014) Musculoskeletal pitfalls and pseudotumours in the pelvis: a pictorial review for body imagers. Br J Radiol 87:20140243
Grant, Michael J; Didier, Ryne A; Stevens, Jeffrey S et al. (2014) Radiation-induced liver disease as a mimic of liver metastases at serial PET/CT during neoadjuvant chemoradiation of distal esophageal cancer. Abdom Imaging 39:963-8