The IMSD program "Graduate and Undergraduate Training in Biomedicine at ASU" will have a significant impact across the ASU campus. The goal of the program is to increase in the number of underrepresented students, including ethnic minority, financially disadvantaged and disabled students, that earn a Ph.D. and pursue research careers in biomedical/behavioral disciplines. An innovative feature of the program is its emphasis on creating a supportive environment for young scientists through community connections that highlights the relevance of biomedical research to the health challenges facing their communities. We feel this focus will increase the appeal of the program to underrepresented students and also enhance their ability to complete their degree. Our goals will be accomplished through the pursuit of two Specific Aims.
In Aim 1 we plan to increase the number of underrepresented undergraduates at ASU who are prepared and motivated to enter graduate studies in biomedical/behavioral sciences. We propose a four-year undergraduate program beginning with entering freshman.
In Aim 2 we plan to increase the number of underrepresented graduate students who earn their Ph.D. at ASU and choose to continue in research in biomedical/behavioral sciences. We propose a two-year graduate student program that will focus on entering students. For both Aims we will expand our recruitment efforts both within Arizona and beyond via collaborations with well-respected Mathematics programs for underrepresented students at ASU and partnerships with California State Universities. We will expand research opportunities for students in diseases affecting their communities, for example through the ASU/Mayo Clinic Center for Metabolic and Vascular Biology and the Maricopa Insulin Resistance Initiative. We will provide a supportive environment by mentoring faculty on the challenges faced by underrepresented students, by utilizing peer mentoring and by offering a suite of workshops/seminars covering topics such as science writing, critical thinking, quantitative methods and responsible conduct of research. Overall, our broad training program will: excite a total of 80 graduate and undergraduate students over four years with its connection to health-care issues in their community, facilitate their access to a wide range of faculty mentors and enhance their research experience with structured academic activities. We will employ bi-annual formative evaluations to identify opportunities for program improvement in real time and a summative evaluation to set the stage for training the next generation of underrepresented scientists.

Public Health Relevance

We propose a broad training program that will excite a total of 80 graduate and undergraduate students from groups underrepresented in science. An innovative feature of the program is its emphasis on creating a supportive environment for young scientists through community connections that highlights the relevance of biomedical research to the health-care challenges facing their communities. The goal of the program is to increase in the number of underrepresented students that earn a Ph.D. and pursue research careers in biomedical and behavioral fields.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Education Projects (R25)
Project #
5R25GM099650-02
Application #
8437165
Study Section
Minority Programs Review Committee (MPRC)
Program Officer
Janes, Daniel E
Project Start
2012-03-02
Project End
2016-01-31
Budget Start
2013-02-01
Budget End
2014-01-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$542,879
Indirect Cost
$35,463
Name
Arizona State University-Tempe Campus
Department
Other Basic Sciences
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
943360412
City
Tempe
State
AZ
Country
United States
Zip Code
85287
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