The Survey Research Center at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan will continue data collection activities for this longitudinal study and produce datasets in co{lat}oration with the University of Southern California for public release. The purpose of this study is to continue longitudinal data collection activities to assess a variety of cognitive abilities using different modes of administration. In particular, we will conduct follow-up interviews with participants in two samples - Cognition and Aging in the USA (CogUSA) and the National Growth and Change Studies (CogNGCS). For this project, we propose to conduct measurements of the CogUSA participants on up to four separate occasions and CogNGCS participants on two occasions using both telephone and internet modes of administration (i.e., a total of >6,800 tests during this project period). Telephone and internet survey instruments will be developed in coliaboration with John J. McArdle at the University of Southern California. In addition, we will collect saliva samples from these participants for genetic material analysis. Data will be analyzed to examine data quality prior to delivering the data to the University of Southem California research team. These data will be used to create a large, longitudinal public-use dataset that will be analyzed and used to understand age trends in cognitive abilities, the measurement of different cognitive abilities in multiple modes of administration, the relationship of cognitive abilities and trajectories to genetic characteristics, and relations to economic behavior indicators, based on a continued collaboration with the Cognitive Economics (CogEcon) project team directed by Robert J. Willis, In addition, these data may be used to inform HRS Co-Investigators about how to improve upon existing HRS cognitive measures in future waves of the HRS, particularly in relation to the validity of cognitive testing via the telephone and internet.

Public Health Relevance

The purpose of this study is to continue longitudinal data collection activities to assess a variety of cognitive abilities using different modes of administration. For this project, we propose to conduct measurements ofthe CogUSA participants on up to four separate occasions and CogNGCS participants on two occasions using both telephone and internet modes of administration. In addition, we will collect saliva samples from these participants for genetic material analysis.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Method to Extend Research in Time (MERIT) Award (R37)
Project #
3R37AG007137-25S1
Application #
8847432
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (NSS)
Program Officer
Nielsen, Lisbeth
Project Start
1987-06-01
Project End
2016-04-30
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-04-30
Support Year
25
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$5,000
Indirect Cost
$1,913
Name
University of Southern California
Department
Psychology
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
072933393
City
Los Angeles
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90089
Fisher, Gwenith G; Stachowski, Alicia; Infurna, Frank J et al. (2014) Mental work demands, retirement, and longitudinal trajectories of cognitive functioning. J Occup Health Psychol 19:231-42
Gonzalez, Hector M; Tarraf, Wassim; Bowen, Mary E et al. (2013) What do parents have to do with my cognitive reserve? Life course perspectives on twelve-year cognitive decline. Neuroepidemiology 41:101-9
Small, Brent J; Dixon, Roger A; McArdle, John J et al. (2012) Do changes in lifestyle engagement moderate cognitive decline in normal aging? Evidence from the Victoria Longitudinal Study. Neuropsychology 26:144-55
Small, Brent J; Dixon, Roger A; McArdle, John J (2011) Tracking cognition-health changes from 55 to 95 years of age. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci 66 Suppl 1:i153-61
Jajodia, Archana; Borders, Ashley (2011) Memory predicts changes in depressive symptoms in older adults: a bidirectional longitudinal analysis. J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci 66:571-81
McArdle, John J; Plassman, Brenda L (2009) A biometric latent curve analysis of memory decline in older men of the NAS-NRC twin registry. Behav Genet 39:472-95
Gerstorf, Denis; Hoppmann, Christiane A; Kadlec, Kelly M et al. (2009) Memory and depressive symptoms are dynamically linked among married couples: longitudinal evidence from the AHEAD study. Dev Psychol 45:1595-610
McArdle, John J (2009) Latent variable modeling of differences and changes with longitudinal data. Annu Rev Psychol 60:577-605
McArdle, John J; Prindle, John J (2008) A latent change score analysis of a randomized clinical trial in reasoning training. Psychol Aging 23:702-19
McArdle, John J; Fisher, Gwenith G; Kadlec, Kelly M (2007) Latent variable analyses of age trends of cognition in the Health and Retirement Study, 1992-2004. Psychol Aging 22:525-45

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