X-ray scattering is an important tool for solving non-crystalline biological structures relevant to various health-related problems. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) has an active user community that utilizes X-ray scattering methods to study the structures of proteins in solution, lipid membranes, and biological tissues. Subjects of the user research range from viruses, to the molecular mechanism of cancer, to stress-strain properties of prosthetic tissues and bones, studies which could be further exploited in drug discovery. Beam time for several NSLS scattering beamlines that are suitable for biological applications has been consistently over-subscribed in recent years. A new state-of-the-art, undulator-based X9 beamline has been commissioned and provide the much-needed capacity for biological X-ray scattering. X9 has the unique capability of simultaneous small angle and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) measurements, in both transmission and grazing incidence geometry, as well as X-ray reflectivity (XR) measurements. This instrument allow researchers to collect completed sets of X-ray scattering data that traditionally require separate instruments, and therefore also allow the facility as a whole to accommodate more users. X9's simultaneous SAXS/WAXS and XR capability is currently realized by two detectors based on charge-coupled devices (CCDs). Due to CCDs'intrinsic electronic noises, these detectors are not ideal for biological applications, in which sample scattering is often weak and contains diffuse features. They are also fairly slow, limiting the throughput of some measurements. Photon counting pixel array detectors have emerged. Compared to the existing detectors, these new detectors are noise-free, faster, more efficient, have higher dynamic range and finite energy resolution. Here, we request funding for a simultaneous SAXS/WAXS detector system, which consist of a pair of PILATUS 1M-F pixel array detectors to replace the existing CCD detectors at X9. The advantages of the new detectors will translate directly into better quality and capability in X-ray scattering measurements on non-crystalline biological samples.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Office of The Director, National Institutes of Health (OD)
Type
Biomedical Research Support Shared Instrumentation Grants (S10)
Project #
1S10OD012331-01
Application #
8334938
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-BCMB-R (30))
Program Officer
Levy, Abraham
Project Start
2012-07-15
Project End
2014-07-14
Budget Start
2012-07-15
Budget End
2014-07-14
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$1,057,550
Indirect Cost
Name
State University New York Stony Brook
Department
Biomedical Engineering
Type
Schools of Engineering
DUNS #
804878247
City
Stony Brook
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
11794