Clinician scientists in infectious diseases must serve as leaders in the development of new strategies to effectively prevent, diagnose, and treat infection. This requires clinicians to build upon scientific advancements from varied disciplines through collaboration with basic scientists, clinical investigators, and translational researchers whose work is "bench to bedside". Given the current nature of post-doctoral MD research training, relatively few physicians have the interdisciplinary clinical and research training needed to conduct high quality research that address infectious diseases. Also, with the global burden of infectious disease, clinical researchers who are able to conduct basic science, clinical investigation and translational research on an international level is imperative. The ultimate goals of this research training program is to develop academic leaders in infectious diseases by 1) providing a dynamic, highly collaborative training environment with outstanding research opportunities, particularly for those interested in international ID;2) providing a structured supportive training process that consistently trains research-na?ve physicians producing productive physician-investigators who have successfully competed for extramural funds after program graduation;and 3) promoting the academic success of underrepresented minority and women physician-investigators, critical for the future creditability of academic medicine. We propose to achieve this goal by providing two years of integrated research experience and coursework to post-doctoral fellows in Adult Infectious Diseases at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. The Johns Hopkins University is uniquely qualified to develop and maintain such a program given the on-going research of our faculty, the successful outcomes of our previous trainees, the resources available, and the continuous influx of bright dedicated infectious diseases physicians. The proposed training program will be unique at Johns Hopkins University because of its emphasis on the development of successful leaders in infectious diseases research.

Public Health Relevance

The Johns Hopkins Division of Infectious Diseases has a strong history of over 20 years of training academics researchers, government and industry leaders, and expert hospital epidemiologists and clinicians. Continued funding will allow us to provide: a dynamic, highly collaborative training environment with outstanding research opportunities, a structured supportive training process that consistently trains research-na?ve physicians producing productive physician-investigators, and additional international training opportunities to increase our impact on global health. Our physician-investigator trainees have successfully competed for extramural funds after program graduation and promote the academic success of underrepresented minority and women physician-investigators who are critically needed for the future of academic medicine and public health.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32AI007291-22
Application #
8313848
Study Section
Microbiology and Infectious Diseases B Subcommittee (MID)
Program Officer
Mcsweegan, Edward
Project Start
1986-09-01
Project End
2016-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2013-08-31
Support Year
22
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$403,311
Indirect Cost
$25,653
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
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