This application continues support for the Training Program in Cancer Biology launched in 2011 to train postdoctoral and predoctoral trainees for careers in cancer research. The program is based in the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center (UMGCC), and includes UMGCC faculty from multiple basic science and clinical departments - the majority based on the University of Maryland Baltimore (UMB) campus, with others from the University of Maryland College Park (UMCP) and the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). A fuller mechanistic understanding of cancer biology will lead to progressively more effective cancer diagnosis, therapy, and prevention. A major goal of the Training Program is to maximize our opportunity to apply emerging fundamental scientific insights to clinical outcomes by training exceptionally talented and highly trained physician- and PhD-scientists who will translate between the laboratory bench and the bedsides of patients with cancer. The Training Program provides a rigorous educational curriculum in basic cancer research and the immersion of trainees in the nurturing structure of individualized, integrated, multidisciplinary mentoring. Participating Faculty are selected based on their published scientific achievements and track record of funding in cancer research, interest in translational cancer research and experience in mentoring trainees. Trainees will gain an appreciation for productive translation between lab and clinic by participating in research and didactic sessions with interactive teams of lab and clinical researchers. A range of cutting-edge technologies and shared resources that facilitate specialized research activities supports all investigators. The Training Program builds on the Cancer Biology Track within the Molecular Medicine Program of the Graduate Program in Life Sciences, which provides students with a solid grounding in the multidisciplinary aspects of basic, translational and clinical cancer research, yet allows them the flexibility to specialize in their area of interest in the labs of selected UMGCC faculty. Collectively, there is faculty expertise available to trainees in virtually all aspects of contemporary biomedical science. In this renewal application, we propose the continued evolution of this Training Program with expanded research training in translational cancer biology and cancer genomics.

Public Health Relevance

A fuller mechanistic understanding of cancer biology will lead to progressively more effective cancer diagnosis, therapy, and prevention. This application continues support for the Training Program in Cancer Biology launched in 2011, to train the next generation of basic, translational and clinical researchers at the Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland Baltimore. A strength of the program is the training of exceptionally talented physician-scientists and PhD scientists to translate between the laboratory bench and the bedsides of patients with cancer.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32CA154274-07
Application #
9308870
Study Section
Subcommittee I - Transistion to Independence (NCI)
Program Officer
Perkins, Susan N
Project Start
2011-07-01
Project End
2021-06-30
Budget Start
2017-07-01
Budget End
2018-06-30
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2017
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Maryland Baltimore
Department
Physiology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
188435911
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21201
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