ISAP Training Program in Addiction Health Services Research This application is for the renewal (Years 21-25) of the pre- and postdoctoral training program at the Integrated Substance Abuse Programs (ISAP) in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The ISAP Training Program in Addiction Health Services Research takes advantage of the depth of addiction-related resources at UCLA, and especially the concentration of addiction researchers at ISAP, to provide a comprehensive training program in fundamental addiction research, with a specialized focus on treatment interventions, longitudinal research, and addiction health services. Specific goals of the planned 2-year training program are to equip researchers with the skills needed to undertake research of the highest quality on: (1) the organization and delivery of drug treatment services, including integration with mental health, primary care, and other health and social services;(2) workforce issues, organizational development, and implementation research;(3) economics and financing of drug treatment services;(4) criminal justice systems and treatment interventions for offenders;(5) longitudinal drug use and health and recovery outcomes;and (6) treatment/service use among women, racial/ethnic groups, impoverished/homeless individuals, youth and older adults, and individuals with or affected by HIV/AIDS. Addiction health services researchers are needed who are equipped with the conceptual models, research methodologies, and analytic skills to undertake scientific research to evaluate changes in the organization, delivery, and outcomes of treatment and other services for individuals with substance use disorders within the broader context of the changing health services system. The ISAP training program will focus on this area of research, with the goal of addressing the need for a new generation of addiction health services researchers. Since 1991, the ISAP training program has trained a total of 30 predoctoral and 50 postdoctoral trainees;trainees have an excellent record of employment and productivity in addiction and related research. The program will continue to train 2 predoctoral and 3 postdoctoral fellows per year. The program is guided by an Executive Committee (Grella, Hser, Murphy, and Farabee);trainees have access to 4 Senior Mentors (Rawson, Ling, Shoptaw, and Anglin) as well as 23 other Resource Faculty located in the UCLA Schools of Medicine, Dentistry, Nursing, and Public Affairs. Trainees participate in a 2-year ISAP core curriculum as well as additional coursework, training activities in professional and career development, and ongoing research activities under the guidance of a team of mentors. Trainees are also linked with a wide range of resources at UCLA related to addiction research, training, and professional development. Trainee progress is evaluated on an ongoing basis by the Executive Committee, and corrective actions proposed as needed. In the upcoming funding period, a plan for soliciting external input for evaluating the ISAP training program is proposed.

Public Health Relevance

Within the context of significant changes in public health policy related to the delivery of health services, it is imperative that addiction health services researchers are equipped with the skills needed to undertake research in this area. The ISAP Training Program in Addiction Health Services Research will provide training for pre- and postdoctoral trainees in the conceptual models, research methodologies, and analytic skills needed to undertake addiction health services research. Such research is needed to inform public health policy on the organization, delivery, and outcomes of treatment and other services for individuals with substance use disorders within the context of the broader health services system. The ISAP training program will address the need for a new generation of addiction health services researchers who are trained to conduct research in this area.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
2T32DA007272-21
Application #
8470106
Study Section
Human Development Research Subcommittee (NIDA)
Program Officer
Duffy, Sarah Q
Project Start
1991-09-30
Project End
2018-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
21
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$254,461
Indirect Cost
$16,479
Name
University of California Los Angeles
Department
None
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
092530369
City
Los Angeles
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90095
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Hartwell, Emily E; Pfeifer, James G; McCauley, Jenna L et al. (2014) Sleep disturbances and pain among individuals with prescription opioid dependence. Addict Behav 39:1537-42
Saxena, Preeta; Messina, Nena; Grella, Christine E (2014) Who Benefits from Gender Responsive Treatment? Accounting for Abuse History on Longitudinal Outcomes for Women in Prison. Crim Justice Behav 41:417-432

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