The Molecular and Cellular Biology (MCB) training program at The University of Chicago is a long- standing interdisciplinary program that trains graduate students for independent academic and research careers in the biomedical sciences. This application requests support for years 38 through 42. Historically, the MCB program has actively supported 28-30 students for 2-3 years each, with a total of ~50-60 trainees in residence at any given time. Based on the success of our recent efforts to recruit highly qualified training grant-eligible students, 30 slots are requested for the next funding period. Students participating in this program are drawn primarily from four graduate programs: (1) Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, (2) Cell and Molecular Biology, (3) Development, Regeneration, and Stem Cell Biology, and (4) Microbiology. The mission of the MCB program is to train students to analyze biological processes using the conceptual and experimental tools of biochemistry and molecular, cellular, and structural biology. This training program is focused around a coherent set of scientific themes, but is intrinsically interdisciplinary in nature. The students take a cor set of courses in molecular biology, cell biology, and macromolecular structure. They subsequently pursue research projects involving a diverse set of model systems and approaches. The scientific interactions among the trainees are extensive, and are promoted by formal mechanisms that include monthly student presentations at the MCB Research in Progress series, meetings with trainee-invited distinguished lecturers, and the annual MCB Minisymposium, as well as the weekly MCB-affiliated Graduate Student Seminar series and the annual Molecular Biosciences retreat. The MCB Director or co-Director meets individually with all trainees in residence on an annual basis, to monitor their academic and research progress and to obtain feedback about the program. Historically, the MCB training program has taken the lead in developing a framework for comprehensive graduate training in the molecular biosciences, and this process is ongoing. For example, the MCB Director and co-Director are pioneering the development of an advanced bioethics course. In the Biological Sciences Division, the MCB training program provides a unique framework for fostering communication and collaboration between researchers who share an interest in approaching biological questions at the molecular and cellular level.

Public Health Relevance

The mission of the MCB program is to train Ph.D. students to analyze biological processes using the conceptual and experimental tools of biochemistry and molecular, cellular, and structural biology. This long-standing interdisciplinary training program prepares graduates for independent academic and research careers in the biomedical sciences.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32GM007183-39
Application #
8685985
Study Section
National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group (BRT)
Program Officer
Gindhart, Joseph G
Project Start
1975-07-01
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2014-07-01
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
39
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Chicago
Department
Genetics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60637
Oakes, Patrick W; Wagner, Elizabeth; Brand, Christoph A et al. (2017) Optogenetic control of RhoA reveals zyxin-mediated elasticity of stress fibres. Nat Commun 8:15817
Dulberger, Charles L; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Hölzemer, Angelique et al. (2017) Human Leukocyte Antigen F Presents Peptides and Regulates Immunity through Interactions with NK Cell Receptors. Immunity 46:1018-1029.e7
Steimle, J D; Moskowitz, I P (2017) TBX5: A Key Regulator of Heart Development. Curr Top Dev Biol 122:195-221
Hope, C Matthew; Rebay, Ilaria; Reinitz, John (2017) DNA Occupancy of Polymerizing Transcription Factors: A Chemical Model of the ETS Family Factor Yan. Biophys J 112:180-192
Lee, Philbert; Jiang, Shangwen; Li, Yuanyuan et al. (2017) Phosphorylation of Pkp1 by RIPK4 regulates epidermal differentiation and skin tumorigenesis. EMBO J 36:1963-1980
Witte, Kristen; Strickland, Devin; Glotzer, Michael (2017) Cell cycle entry triggers a switch between two modes of Cdc42 activation during yeast polarization. Elife 6:
Schwartz, Michael H; Pan, Tao (2017) Function and origin of mistranslation in distinct cellular contexts. Crit Rev Biochem Mol Biol 52:205-219
Riback, Joshua A; Katanski, Christopher D; Kear-Scott, Jamie L et al. (2017) Stress-Triggered Phase Separation Is an Adaptive, Evolutionarily Tuned Response. Cell 168:1028-1040.e19
Anderson, Mark; Ohr, Ryan Jay; Aly, Khaled A et al. (2017) EssE Promotes Staphylococcus aureus ESS-Dependent Protein Secretion To Modify Host Immune Responses during Infection. J Bacteriol 199:
Burke, Thomas A; Harker, Alyssa J; Dominguez, Roberto et al. (2017) The bacterial virulence factors VopL and VopF nucleate actin from the pointed end. J Cell Biol 216:1267-1276

Showing the most recent 10 out of 294 publications