This proposal seeks the next five years of support to continue our established training program entitled Quantitative Biology and Physiology (QBP). Our mission is to train PhD research scientists who have: (1) a quantitatively based understanding of the principles underlying molecular biology, cell biology and physiology;(2) the capacity to synthesize modern and quantitatively driven experimental methods with biology and physiology;(3) the ability to synthesize mechanistically and structurally based modeling skills with biological and physiological systems;and (4) the capacity to assess emergent properties and behaviors via integration across multiple scales (molecular-cellular-tissue-organ) of a biological or physiological system or process. The specific objectives of our renewal are: To maintain and strengthen a core interdisciplinary faculty of mentors primarily from Biomedical Engineering, but also including Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical &Computer Engineering and departments at the BU School of Medicine. To provide a program curriculum that includes rigorous training in quantitative molecular biology, cell biology, and physiology at multiple length scales. To provide laboratory rotations that ensure exposure to quantitative and systems/dynamics research techniques relevant to problems at multiple scales of biology and physiology. To provide graduate trainees with the opportunity to conduct thesis research that is interdisciplinary, quantitative, integrativ, and linked to experimental and/or clinical data. To strengthen the unique identity and impact of the QBP program and community via interactive components, including a Journal Club, a yearly QBP Symposium, and Monthly Dinners. The BME department continues to attract high caliber trainees who have organized to create an empowering identity. These trainees also sustain activities that foster the themes of the QBP program so as to enrich the entire institution. We have expanded our training mentor pool, improved the quality of the department as a whole, and revised our administrative approach based on experience and feedback. We look forward to the opportunity to continue this momentum during the next grant cycle.

Public Health Relevance

This proposal seeks another five years of support to continue and enhance our established predoctoral-student training program in Quantitative Biology and Physiology (QBP). The mission of the QBP Program is to train PhD research scientists who have: (1) a quantitatively based understanding of the principles underlying molecular biology, cell biology and physiology;(2) the capacity to synthesize modern and quantitatively driven experimental methods with biology and physiology;(3) the ability to synthesize mechanistically and structurally based modeling skills with biological and physical systems;and (4) the capacity to assess emergent properties and behavior via integration across multiple levels (molecular-cellular-tissue-organ) of a biological or physiological system or process.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32GM008764-12
Application #
8490391
Study Section
National Institute of General Medical Sciences Initial Review Group (BRT)
Program Officer
Maas, Stefan
Project Start
2000-07-01
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
12
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$312,582
Indirect Cost
$14,858
Name
Boston University
Department
Engineering (All Types)
Type
Schools of Engineering
DUNS #
049435266
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02215
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