The University of California, Davis (UCD), Center for Comparative Respiratory Biology and Medicine (CCRBM) seeks to renew the Training in Comparative Lung Biology and Medicine Program for years 36-40. Over the last 34 years, 48 post- and 70 pre-doctoral trainees have been trained in the program. In the past 10 years, we have trained 17 post- and 24 pre-doctoral trainees. All previous post-doctoral trainees and 85% of previous pre-doctoral trainees are currently engaged in research and service (13 post/16 pre in University, 1/6 in industry, 3/1 in government). The continuous program is designed to train 6 pre- and 3 post-doctoral trainees each year to become independent investigators in pulmonary research. The duration of training depends on individual trainee's prior experience and capabilities to transition to their own independent academic and/or research careers. Candidates will be selected with special efforts given to minority recruitment strategies. Trainees will be selected from the pool of candidates applying to: programs in the CCRBM and Pulmonary Division;graduate groups at UCD;or to individual training faculty member. Candidates must also provide evidence of previous research training and a commitment relevant to the CCRBM research activities and priorities. Strong emphasis will be given to broad scope lung research training activities with focuses on lung comparative biology and cellular/molecular mechanisms. Faculty preceptors will direct research training in five primary areas: 1) stem cell biology, regenerative medicine and lung cancer malignancy;2) airway pathophysiology;3) lung toxo-pharmacology;4) lung inflammation and immunity;and 5) translational research. The training program includes an organized core curriculum consisting of research training in scientific ethics and paper/grant writing strategies, basic lung pathobiology, immunology and new technology in proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, and clinical and translational research through our association with the UC Davis Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC). Research/training conferences include weekly CCRBM seminar series, specialized seminar series, annual """"""""Lung Day"""""""" symposium, work-in-progress, and individual lab meeting sessions to assess trainee progress. Throughout the training program, mentoring and career planning is emphasized so the Program can be individualized to best achieve each trainee's personal goals. The program is designed to take advantage of the existing strengths at UC Davis, including well established collaborations between lung researchers in the School of Medicine and the School of Veterinary Medicine, a National Primate Research Center, a mouse biology program, sophistic inhalation facility, modern Genome Center, and NIH-designated West coast Metabolomics Labs in Davis campus, and first-rate Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC), Stem cell regenerative medicine program, the comprehensive UCDMC cancer center and a very strong clinical program in pulmonary and critical care medicine. The program has drawn faculty trainers from 36 to 40 faculty members of 4 schools/college and 17 departments/divisions.

Public Health Relevance

The goal of the Training Program in Comparative Respiratory Biology and Medicine is to produce a new blend of scientists and clinician scientists who are poised to exchange ideas, expertise, and techniques leading to the direct and effective flow and translation of basic science discoveries into clinical testing and applications, as well as generate mechanistic hypotheses that can be tested at the basic cellular level, directly derived from clinical research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
2T32HL007013-36A1
Application #
8743133
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHL1)
Program Officer
Tigno, Xenia
Project Start
1975-07-01
Project End
2019-06-30
Budget Start
2014-07-01
Budget End
2015-06-30
Support Year
36
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California Davis
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
City
Davis
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
95618
Courter, Lauren A; Shaffo, Frances C; Ghogha, Atefeh et al. (2016) BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons requires p75(NTR) signaling. Dev Neurobiol 76:1003-13
Hoang, Laura L; Nguyen, Yen P; Aspeé, Rayza et al. (2016) Temporal and Spatial Expression of Transforming Growth Factor-β after Airway Remodeling to Tobacco Smoke in Rats. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 54:872-81
Statt, Sarah; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Huang, Chih-Ting et al. (2015) Lipidome and transcriptome profiling of pneumolysin intoxication identifies networks involved in statin-conferred protection of airway epithelial cells. Sci Rep 5:10624
Yang, Jun; Bratt, Jennifer; Franzi, Lisa et al. (2015) Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor attenuates inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness in mice. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 52:46-55
Smith, Zachary J; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu et al. (2015) Single exosome study reveals subpopulations distributed among cell lines with variability related to membrane content. J Extracell Vesicles 4:28533
Statt, Sarah; Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Hung, Li-Yin et al. (2015) Statin-conferred enhanced cellular resistance against bacterial pore-forming toxins in airway epithelial cells. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 53:689-702
Schivo, Michael; Aksenov, Alexander A; Linderholm, Angela L et al. (2014) Volatile emanations from in vitro airway cells infected with human rhinovirus. J Breath Res 8:037110
Aksenov, Alexander A; Sandrock, Christian E; Zhao, Weixiang et al. (2014) Cellular scent of influenza virus infection. Chembiochem 15:1040-8
Chen, Ching-Hsien; Statt, Sarah; Chiu, Chun-Lung et al. (2014) Targeting myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate phosphorylation site domain in lung cancer. Mechanisms and therapeutic implications. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 190:1127-38
Clay, Candice C; Maniar-Hew, Kinjal; Gerriets, Joan E et al. (2014) Early life ozone exposure results in dysregulated innate immune function and altered microRNA expression in airway epithelium. PLoS One 9:e90401

Showing the most recent 10 out of 81 publications