The Cardiovascular Research Training Program (CRTP) was established at the University of New Mexico upon the funding of this Minority Institutional Research Training (MIRT) Grant fifteen years ago. It has sensed to provide opportunities for underrepresented minority predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees to gain research training in cardiovascular biology. This grant has also been a catalyst for the development of an integrated program of research and training in cardiovascular sciences at the university. The CRTP bridges the basic and clinical sciences and has fostered new productive collaborations between disciplines. This area of research and training emphasis has particular relevance to the state of New Mexico where the incidence of cardiovascular-related disease is high, especially in the Hispanic and Native American populations. During the tenure of the grant, several new programs have evolved that unify research in the cardiovascular sciences at UNM, including the formation ofthe Vascular Physiology Group with researchers from the School of Medicine and the College of Pharmacy. The Vascular Physiology Group represents the core of the training activities for the CRTP, especially for predoctoral trainees. In addition, since the last application, the Health Sciences Center has identified signature research programs including one focused in Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease (CVMD). This area of research receives special funds from the Office of Research to support pilot studies and to enhance collaborative projects between its members. All of the mentors on this grant are members of this signature program and the Associate Director of the training grant serves as the leader of the CVMD program. Collaborative research is also facilitated by the structure of the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program that offers a unified training environment within the Health Sciences Center. The graduate program is non-departmental and provides interdisciplinary training over a broad base of biomedical science in the first year, followed by in-depth training in the chosen discipline The goals of the current application are to build upon this framework and to improve our success in recruiting and training minority scientists. To foster this latter objective, we have designed recruitment strategies that seek to improve integration of our program with existing minority-based undergraduate and master's programs at the University of New Mexico and partner institutions in our state. In addition, the proposed training program also includes a postdoctoral component involving both basic science and clinical/translational research.

Public Health Relevance

This training program centers on developing the next generation of scientists interested in discovering the mechanisms underiying cardiovascular disease and establishing potential treatments. This has special relevance to the state of New Mexico where the incidence of cardiovascular-related disease is high, especially in the Hispanic and Native American populations.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32HL007736-19
Application #
8497699
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHL1-CSR-H (M2))
Program Officer
Scott, Jane
Project Start
1993-07-01
Project End
2015-07-31
Budget Start
2013-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
19
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$270,049
Indirect Cost
$26,664
Name
University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center
Department
Anatomy/Cell Biology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
829868723
City
Albuquerque
State
NM
Country
United States
Zip Code
87131
Meyer, Matthias R; Fredette, Natalie C; Daniel, Christoph et al. (2016) Obligatory role for GPER in cardiovascular aging and disease. Sci Signal 9:ra105
Aragon, Mario J; Chrobak, Izabela; Brower, Jeremy et al. (2016) Inflammatory and Vasoactive Effects of Serum Following Inhalation of Varied Complex Mixtures. Cardiovasc Toxicol 16:163-71
Perez, Dominique R; Smagley, Yelena; Garcia, Matthew et al. (2016) Cyclic AMP efflux inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for leukemia. Oncotarget 7:33960-82
Meyer, Matthias R; Fredette, Natalie C; Sharma, Geetanjali et al. (2016) GPER is required for the age-dependent upregulation of the myocardial endothelin system. Life Sci 159:61-5
Aragon, Mario; Erdely, Aaron; Bishop, Lindsey et al. (2016) MMP-9-Dependent Serum-Borne Bioactivity Caused by Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Exposure Induces Vascular Dysfunction via the CD36 Scavenger Receptor. Toxicol Sci 150:488-98
Meyer, Matthias R; Fredette, Natalie C; Barton, Matthias et al. (2015) Prostanoid-mediated contractions of the carotid artery become Nox2-independent with aging. Age (Dordr) 37:9806
Meyer, Matthias R; Fredette, Natalie C; Barton, Matthias et al. (2015) G protein-coupled estrogen receptor inhibits vascular prostanoid production and activity. J Endocrinol 227:61-9
Plomaritas, Danielle R; Herbert, Lindsay M; Yellowhair, Tracylyn R et al. (2014) Chronic hypoxia limits H2O2-induced inhibition of ASIC1-dependent store-operated calcium entry in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 307:L419-30
Meyer, Matthias R; Fredette, Natalie C; Barton, Matthias et al. (2014) Endothelin-1 but not angiotensin II contributes to functional aging in murine carotid arteries. Life Sci 118:213-8
Meyer, Matthias R; Fredette, Natalie C; Howard, Tamara A et al. (2014) G protein-coupled estrogen receptor protects from atherosclerosis. Sci Rep 4:7564

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