This competing renewal application for an Institutional NRSA has the goal of continuing to providing education and training to nurses at the predoctoral and postdoctoral level in the field of genetic and genomic research. Genomic research continues to benefit greatly from improved technologies and large research efforts such as the Human Genome Project, International HapMap project, the 1000 Genomes Project, and the Cancer Genome Atlas project. Bringing these efforts to bear upon clinically relevant issues requires that a continuous cadre of individuals receive state of the science education and training to allow them to incorporate genetic and genomics into their research trajectories. Nurses are uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between genomics research and clinical practice. They interact with patients at all stages of life, and in all clinical arenas. Their work is interdisciplinary by nature. More nurses are now receiving education in genomics because of the inclusion of genomics into nursing curricula across the country. Nevertheless, there continue to be few opportunities for long-term laboratory-based training in the conduct of cutting-edge genomics research. Such training opportunities are essential because nearly every condition studied by Nurse Scientists, including those on the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing, has a genetic component. Our objective is to train talented Nurse Scientists, at the beginning stages of their careers, to develop research trajectories related to the application and evaluation of genomics in improving patient outcomes. The goal of the training program is to prepare predoctoral and postdoctoral trainees to incorporate genomics into their research trajectories using didactic courses, clinical rotations, journal clubs, seminars, individualized practica, laboratory experiences, and presentations at scientific meetings. Objectives of the program focus on training in: 1) the integration of genomics into theoretical / conceptual frameworks;2) genomics research methodology (e.g., family studies, genome-wide association studies, gene expression studies);3) genomics laboratory techniques;and 4) clinical application of genomics. Reasons why the School of Nursing at the University of Pittsburgh continues to be the ideal environment for such a training program are elaborated in the application.

Public Health Relevance

This application has the goal of continuing to providing education and training to nurses at the predoctoral and postdoctoral level in the field of genetic and genomic research. Nurses are uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between genomics research and clinical practice. They interact with patients at all stages of life, and in all clinical arenas. There continue to be few opportunities for long-term laboratory-based training in the conduct of cutting-edge genomics research and such training opportunities are essential because nearly every condition studied by Nurse Scientists has a genetic component. Our objective is to train talented Nurse Scientists, at the beginning stages of their careers, to develop research trajectories related to the application and evaluation of genomics in improving patient outcomes.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32NR009759-07
Application #
8277868
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZNR1-REV-W (07))
Program Officer
Mccloskey, Donna J
Project Start
2006-06-01
Project End
2016-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$220,863
Indirect Cost
$14,728
Name
University of Pittsburgh
Department
Miscellaneous
Type
Schools of Nursing
DUNS #
004514360
City
Pittsburgh
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
15213
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