Understanding normal brain development and function and how it is altered by disease, injury, or environmental factors is one of the most exciting frontiers remaining in biomedical science today. New knowledge and tools acquired over the past decade offer hope for the development of new therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders, psychiatric illnesses, spinal cord injury, stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. However, to effectively apply basic science knowledge to address these neural disorders requires the training of a new generation of neuroscientists. The goal of this training program is to provide five trainees in the first two years of Ph.D. training with a deep understanding of nervous system function and dysfunction at multiple levels of organization (molecular, cellular, circuit, behavior) and with the ability to apply diverse approaches (molecular/genetic, physiology, imaging) to understand how the nervous system develops, functions, and responds to injury or disease. This will be achieved by a program of formal course work and laboratory rotations with a highly interactive group of trainers whose expertise spans a broad range of neuroscience, in addition to active, continuous self-learning though participation in journal clubs, outside seminars, and other interactive forums. The program is aimed at equipping the trainees with the skills needed to identify and solve important problems throughout their careers as independent scientists.

Public Health Relevance

The training provided by this program will enable a new generation of neuroscientists to apply their knowledge of basic neuroscience mechanisms to develop therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders, psychiatric illnesses, spinal cord injury, stoke, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32NS067431-14
Application #
8268394
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1-MRG-C (32))
Program Officer
Korn, Stephen J
Project Start
1999-09-01
Project End
2014-06-30
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$215,537
Indirect Cost
$10,793
Name
Case Western Reserve University
Department
Neurosciences
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
077758407
City
Cleveland
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
44106
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Lee, Sungho; Xu, Guixiang; Jay, Taylor R et al. (2014) Opposing effects of membrane-anchored CX3CL1 on amyloid and tau pathologies via the p38 MAPK pathway. J Neurosci 34:12538-46
Niemi, Jon P; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Roldan-Hernandez, Lilinete et al. (2013) A critical role for macrophages near axotomized neuronal cell bodies in stimulating nerve regeneration. J Neurosci 33:16236-48