This institutional T-32 training grant (RR07073) proposal seeks funds to continue an outstanding environment for veterinarians (DVM or VMD) and DVM/PhDs to acquire specific research and conceptual skills to effectively utilize mouse models of human disease. Significant need exists for skilled scientists trained in modern translational research methods to apply advances in medicine to improve human health. The training program has enrolled 20 DVMs into the program since 2002 through outstanding recruitment and leverage of resources. Of the 20 trainees supported over the first 9 years of the program, 8 were awarded NIH K, TL1, or F Awards and 13 have matriculated and are employed in biomedical or academic positions and the remaining are on track to complete their training. All veterinarians recruited into the program have outstanding academic backgrounds and established records of research experiences. New training faculty and courses compliment experienced mentors who train veterinarian scientists in state-of-the-art molecular and cellular techniques to systematically evaluate the pathobiology of experimental mouse models of human disease important to public health. The training program is coordinated through The Ohio State University (OSU), College of Veterinary Medicine, Graduate Program in Comparative and Veterinary Medicine;an integral component of the most comprehensive health sciences center in America.
The Specific Aims of the training program include: 1) trainees will gain knowledge and skills to fully understand and evaluate pathophysiologic alterations of murine models of human disease through both didactic coursework and applied training in pathology and molecular biology;2) trainees will interact with our multidisciplinary faculty to identify the rane of research problems that use murine and other rodent models;3) trainees will acquaint themselves with the ongoing basic and clinical research studies in the laboratories and clinical sites of the participating faculty, and select a research problem that utilizes a murine or rodent model for endpoint evaluation;and 4) following the selection of a preceptor and research problem, trainees will participate in the design and performance of experiments, as well as analysis and presentation of data.
These specific aims support the overall goal of the T-32 Program to support trainees to acquire a broad background in molecular biology, genetics, pathology, laboratory animal medicine, and research design methodology. Training faculty represent an experienced group of basic and clinical scientists with strong training records from collaborative programs in multiple departments at OSU and Nationwide Children's Hospital. As a result of this training program, trainees will gain a comprehensive understanding of hypothesis-based research and gain knowledge and skills required to fulfill national needs in the development of skilled scientists in mouse pathobiology relevant to human health.

Public Health Relevance

Significant need exists for skilled scientists trained in modern translational research methods to apply advances in medicine to improve human health. This institutional T-32 training grant proposal seeks funds to continue an outstanding environment for veterinarians to acquire specific research and conceptual skills to effectively utilize models of human disease to fulfill national needs for skilled scientists dedicated to improving human health.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Office of The Director, National Institutes of Health (OD)
Type
Institutional National Research Service Award (T32)
Project #
5T32OD010429-13
Application #
8634823
Study Section
National Center for Research Resources Initial Review Group (RIRG)
Program Officer
Moro, Manuel H
Project Start
2001-07-01
Project End
2017-03-31
Budget Start
2014-04-01
Budget End
2015-03-31
Support Year
13
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$156,967
Indirect Cost
$22,594
Name
Ohio State University
Department
Veterinary Sciences
Type
Schools of Veterinary Medicine
DUNS #
832127323
City
Columbus
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
43210
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