This study establishes a new item bank for self-efficacy for the PROMIS project. Self-efficacy is defined as an individual's perception of their ability to successfully perform certain tasks or behaviors, or more specifically, as the belief that one can carry out a behavior to achieve a desired goal related to one's health. Our study will focus upon self-efficacy for self-management of chronic medical conditions. The significance of self-efficacy is based on two main features: 1) self-efficacy is a pivotal mediator of human behavior and 2) self-efficacy has been shown to be modifiable by interventions that foster self-management skills. Successful adjustment and good outcomes in chronic disorders depend upon the ability to adopt and master new behaviors. A multi-step process will be employed to develop the item pool, with contributions from experts in the field of self-efficacy, clinicians, and patients. Validation studies of the self-efficacy item pool will be conducted in five chronic neurologic disorders: epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, peripheral neuropathy, and stroke. We will investigate the effects of diverse clinical features of these disorders on self-efficacy. Based on patient-reported data, we will also assess the magnitude of a clinically important difference and the responsiveness to change of the new self-efficacy measures. Relevance Developing the PROMIS self-efficacy item bank will raise awareness and promote clinical research in self-efficacy in many chronic disorders, thereby pushing this important field forward. The ultimate goal of these studies is to provide information that will aid in the development of interventions to improve self-efficacy, promote self-management and reduce and delay disability.

Public Health Relevance

Developing the PROMIS self-efficacy item bank will raise awareness and promote clinical research in self-efficacy in many chronic disorders, thereby pushing this important field forward. The ultimate goal of these studies is to provide information that will aid in the development of interventions to improve self-efficacy, promote self-management and reduce and delay disability.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS)
Type
Research Project--Cooperative Agreements (U01)
Project #
5U01AR057967-04
Application #
8327639
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-RPHB-A (54))
Program Officer
Serrate-Sztein, Susana
Project Start
2009-09-30
Project End
2014-07-31
Budget Start
2012-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$598,839
Indirect Cost
$259,980
Name
University of Maryland Baltimore
Department
Neurology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
188435911
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21201
Cook, Karon F; Jensen, Sally E; Schalet, Benjamin D et al. (2016) PROMIS measures of pain, fatigue, negative affect, physical function, and social function demonstrated clinical validity across a range of chronic conditions. J Clin Epidemiol 73:89-102
Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Carle, Adam; Barnett, Kimberly et al. (2016) Longitudinal evaluation of patient-reported outcomes measurement information systems measures in pediatric chronic pain. Pain 157:339-47
Dampier, Carlton; Barry, Vaughn; Gross, Heather E et al. (2016) Initial Evaluation of the Pediatric PROMIS® Health Domains in Children and Adolescents With Sickle Cell Disease. Pediatr Blood Cancer 63:1031-7
Schalet, Benjamin D; Pilkonis, Paul A; Yu, Lan et al. (2016) Clinical validity of PROMIS Depression, Anxiety, and Anger across diverse clinical samples. J Clin Epidemiol 73:119-27
Li, Zheng; Thompson, Lindsay A; Gross, Heather E et al. (2016) Longitudinal associations among asthma control, sleep problems, and health-related quality of life in children with asthma: a report from the PROMIS(®) Pediatric Asthma Study. Sleep Med 20:41-50
Thissen, David; Liu, Yang; Magnus, Brooke et al. (2016) Estimating minimally important difference (MID) in PROMIS pediatric measures using the scale-judgment method. Qual Life Res 25:13-23
Stukenborg, George J; Blackhall, Leslie J; Harrison, James H et al. (2016) Longitudinal patterns of cancer patient reported outcomes in end of life care predict survival. Support Care Cancer 24:2217-24
Brandon, Timothy G; Becker, Brandon D; Bevans, Katherine B et al. (2016) Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System® (PROMIS(®) ) Tools for Collecting Patient-Reported Outcomes in Children with Juvenile Arthritis. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken) :
Dampier, Carlton; Jaeger, Byron; Gross, Heather E et al. (2016) Responsiveness of PROMIS® Pediatric Measures to Hospitalizations for Sickle Pain and Subsequent Recovery. Pediatr Blood Cancer 63:1038-45
Reeve, Bryce B; Thissen, David; DeWalt, Darren A et al. (2016) Linkage between the PROMIS® pediatric and adult emotional distress measures. Qual Life Res 25:823-33

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