The UCLA-CMCR Pilot Project Program has been a major success. It has brought 28 investigators into the field of radiation research;young investigators who are just starting their career and experienced investigators who were new to radiation research. As a result the UCLA-CMCR has grown into a strong cadre of investigators from 17 different departments who maintain a vibrant evolving research environment with a focus on mitigating the effects of radiation on normal tissues. This Core has fed new blood into the Program as is seen in renewal submission that has 8 Pilot Project investigators contributing to the proposed Projects and Cores, including one new Project. Core support has led to new grant submissions, publications, industrial collaborations, and the establishment of a database for information on compounds that are being generated by the CMCR. In the next funding period, we propose to have fewer Pilot Research Projects funded by the Core than before, but we have built a strong infrastructure and identified key players who will continue their radiation research, so a smaller Pilot Project program is appropriate for us at this time. We will award 3 grants per year. Recruitment of applicants will be by e-mail and web site. An announcement describing the UCLA CMCR Pilot Research Grant Project will be sent via our Contracts and Grants Office individually to all eligible P.l.s at UCLA and at hospitals and research institutes in the vicinity of UCLA. It will be also distributed through the Southern California Biotechnology Program. The application will be short (3-5 pages) and all proposals will be reviewed and scored by members ofthe Internal and External Scientific Advisory Groups, as well as the Executive Committee. Small projects suited to funding by the Cancer Center (JCCC) will be identified and rerouted to that source. A mentoring program will be in place for young investigators who have yet to receive RO-1 funding and an educational program for those with little knowledge of radiation research.

Public Health Relevance

The purpose of this Core is to support young and experienced scientists who can contribute to the overall aims of the CMCR. It provides not only funding but advice and information for investiagtors entering the field of radiation research. It has been very successful in building a cadre of investigators who are involved in radiation research at UCI_A and who contribute much to the CMCR mission.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Program--Cooperative Agreements (U19)
Project #
5U19AI067769-09
Application #
8513244
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-KS-I)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
9
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$499,049
Indirect Cost
$139,836
Name
University of California Los Angeles
Department
Type
DUNS #
092530369
City
Los Angeles
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90095
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