The Metabolomics Central Service Core will become the hub for all research projects and studies conducted in the West Coast Central Comprehensive Metabolomics Resource Core (WC3MRC). The Central Service Core will handle all service requests, receive and log samples, distribute samples to the Metabolomics Advanced Service Core, acquire data for targeted and untargeted metabolomics, process data, provide statistical analyses and report results. The Core will offer comprehensive advice on study designs and sample handling and will develop quantitative target analyses as requested. Through automated sample handling and improvement of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), precision and accuracy in quantifications will improve while costs are minimized and sample throughput increases. Apart from classic metabolomic and lipidomic platforms, the Core will provide services through established University recharge rates for Molecular Imaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) profiling and bioinformatics. The Core will implement new protocols developed by the Metabolomics Advanced Service Core to improve the number and quality of services offered by the Central Service Core laboratories. Scientists and staff working in this core will coordinate and facilitate service requests and sample processings for metabolomic projects. Clients and collaborators will be consulted on capabilities of the Center, cost estimates and turnaround times. The central LIMS database will be used to facilitate all projects. The Core will receive all samples for the Center, log these into the LIMS system and distribute samples according to the services requested. This Core will be tasked to prepare samples, acquire and process data for targeted and untargeted metabolomics. The Central Service Core will provide a large variety of services for mass spectrometry (MS)-based targeted metabolomics as well as NMR- and MS based untargeted profiling. Services will include the entire pipeline from sample preparation steps, quality controls and data acquisition to processing raw data to provide qualitative and quantitative data according to project scopes. The Central Service Core will implement existing protocols into automation for sample handling in order to improve precision and accuracy of quantitative data, and to accelerate sample throughput in the laboratory. The Core will provide a range of services in molecular imaging of target molecules in animal tissues. The Core will also provide bioinformatics services, including analysis for network biology.

Public Health Relevance

Offering at-cost services for technologies is critical to achieve a critical mass in discoveries in metabolic dysfunctions that cause diseases. Services in this project will be offered to local and regional clients on the West Coast for biomedical and clinical sciences. With these tools, data will be acquired and interpreted that have the potential to yield important breakthroughs in disease diagnostics and treatments.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Resource-Related Research Projects--Cooperative Agreements (U24)
Project #
5U24DK097154-02
Application #
8539788
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-BST-J)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$700,038
Indirect Cost
$166,969
Name
University of California Davis
Department
Type
DUNS #
047120084
City
Davis
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
95618
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