The MARCE consortium fosters research that contributes to the defense of the population of the United States of America against biological threats including the deliberate release of bioterror agents and the natural emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases. As part of its formally defined mission, the MARCE also maintains interactions with public health authorities within the Middle Atlantic Region so that if the need arises, the consortium can mobilize its technical resources to assist the region's public health authorities in the face of a large or unusual outbreak of disease, presumed bioterror incident or other catastrophe. The MARCE consortium that is proposed for the funding cycle of 2009-2014 (MARCE-2) encompasses approximately 65 scientists from 27 research institutions who will engage in a series of collaborative research projects (the vast majority of which represent collaborations that extend across institutional boundaries). Dr. Myron M. Levine, M.D., D.T.P.H., the Grollman Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for Vaccine Development of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, will continue to serve as the Principal Investigator and Director of the MARCE. Dr. Alison O'Brien, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of the Department of Microbiology of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, will continue to serve as Co- Principal Investigator. Figure 4-1 in Section A4 provides an overview organizational chart of MARCE-2.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Specialized Center--Cooperative Agreements (U54)
Project #
5U54AI057168-10
Application #
8442360
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-DDS-M)
Project Start
Project End
2015-02-28
Budget Start
2013-03-01
Budget End
2015-02-28
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$651,707
Indirect Cost
$79,122
Name
University of Maryland Baltimore
Department
Type
DUNS #
188435911
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21201
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